// enables jquery
Simple weather widget
Steamboat Pilot & Today https://www.steamboatpilot.com Serving Steamboat Springs, CO Wed, 13 Mar 2019 20:14:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Crane conservation group to offer creative arts contest scholarships https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/crane-conservation-group-to-offer-creative-arts-contest-scholarships-2/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 19:30:33 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334175 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Colorado Crane Conservation Coalition invites high school seniors in Routt and Moffat counties to submit original writings or artwork inspired by the greater sandhill cranes. From the submissions, the coalition will award $5,000 in scholarships. There are three submission categories: • […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Colorado Crane Conservation Coalition invites high school seniors in Routt and Moffat counties to submit original writings or artwork inspired by the greater sandhill cranes. From the submissions, the coalition will award $5,000 in scholarships.

There are three submission categories:
• Essay: fiction or nonfiction story of 750 to 1,500 words
• Poetry: collection of three poems
• Other artistic media: painting, music, digital art or photography

The work must be original and accurately reflect the physical characteristics, behavior and habitat of the greater sandhill cranes.

A $1,500 scholarship will be awarded in each category, and a $500 honorable mention scholarship will be awarded from any category. Second- and third-place winners will receive a certificate and book about cranes.

The deadline for submission is April 1, and winners will be announced by the end of May.

Scholarship awards are dependent on acceptance into a continuing-education institution. If a winner is not so registered by Nov. 1, the scholarship will be awarded in sequence to a runner-up who qualifies.

Visit coloradocranes.org and click on "programs" for rules and more information.

The 2019 Yampa Valley Crane Festival is slated for Aug. 29 to Sept. 1 and includes guided crane viewings, expert speakers, bird and nature walks, live raptors, children’s activities, crane art, workshops and more. Visit coloradocranes.org for all festival details.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/051816_BabyBird-325x197.jpg
Dance photographer Jordan Matter to showcase Steamboat photography at library talk https://www.steamboatpilot.com/explore-steamboat/dance-photographer-jordan-matter-gives-talk-at-library/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 19:08:10 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334171 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Maybe you saw them when you were strolling through downtown Steamboat Springs: a dancer kicking her leg up into a split in the air above the painted yellow lines dividing the lanes of Lincoln Avenue, her photographer hollering happy encouragement before they both […]]]>
A photo from Jordan Matter’s latest photoshoot in Steamboat Springs. (photo by Jordan Matter)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Maybe you saw them when you were strolling through downtown Steamboat Springs: a dancer kicking her leg up into a split in the air above the painted yellow lines dividing the lanes of Lincoln Avenue, her photographer hollering happy encouragement before they both dashed back onto the sidewalk to get out of traffic's way.

Maybe you saw a dancer on a single tiptoe by the jukebox at Lyon Drugs, casually sipping a pink milkshake, or two dancers leaping, somehow, into the shape of a circle by the Rabbit Ears Motel sign.

If you missed these sights in real life, don't despair. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14, Manhattan-based dance photographer Jordan Matter will host a talk about his work in Bud Werner Memorial Library’s Library Hall. Matter has published several books of his photography and is a YouTube star with more than two million subscribers.

If you go

What: Library Author Series presents Jordan Matter
When: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 14
Where: Library Hall, 1289 Lincoln Ave.

Matter's most recent collection, New York Times bestseller “Born to Dance,” celebrates the wonder of childhood in large-scale photographs.

"My (then 3-year-old) son was playing. and I saw his enthusiasm for that exact moment of his life," Matter said. "We lose that as we grow up. I thought I could use dancers as a way to exaggerate that, celebrating the joy of every moment of your life."

Matter's son is now a teen photographer, and his daughter is a dancer often featured in Matter's work. Both will be in attendance at the library talk.

Before Matter began photographing dancers, he knew next to nothing about dance terminology. The dancers were patient with him in the beginning, Matter said, as he'd try to explain or demonstrate the kick or dance pose he envisioned.

"I think that not knowing how to do something should never stop you from trying it," Matter said.

"Born to Dance" features Steamboat's Soleil Nelson, photographed in the middle of a flying inverted split in between bookshelves at Bud Werner Memorial Library.

Matter's other books and projects include "Dancers Among Us" (also a New York Times bestseller), "Tiny Dancers Among Us," "Dancers After Dark," "Uncovered," "Athletes Among Us" and "Circus Among Us."

Millions of YouTube users also know Matter from his 10 Minute Photo Challenge videos, in which Matter and a subject or two — usually dancers or athletes — race a timer to take as many quality shots in a certain setting, such as a Manhattan subway and platform, a Southern California pier and in the waters below it, or the lampposts of London.

At a glance

Jordan Matter's tips for making your portraits better:

  • For a beautiful portrait, find a background that matches the color of the person's eyes.
  • You want the subject sharp and the background blurry. To do this, use a long lens; the higher the number, the better.
  • For ideal light, shoot in the morning or late afternoon.
  • You want to get far away from the background. For example, if you want a mountain in the shot, you don’t want to have the dancer on the mountain; you want the dancer far away from the mountain so the mountain can be in the background.
  • If you want to shoot someone in action, you want to use a shutter speed of 1/1000th of a second.

Matter has shot across four continents and in too many cities and small towns to count off the top of his head.

His nontraditional use of public spaces for his photo shoots sometimes brings him into contact with local law enforcement.

"A lot of people would have a strong negative reaction to getting yelled at, but that happens to me fairly regularly, so it doesn't bother me anymore," Matter chuckled. "And usually, by then, I've already gotten the shot."

His videos often include advisories for viewers to not try these stunts at home.

Matter coaches his subjects through moves that make viewers' eyes pop: kicks that seem to stretch human anatomy and flips that seem to defy all logic.

Matter's words to his subjects are spoken quickly. He's constantly moving onto the next pose and space, always diving into the next scene without missing a beat and never wasting a millisecond.

"I work to make the process fun and fast paced. That pace gets people out of their head,” Matter said. “And I have this constant fear of missing the shot. If we don't get it right now, it'll be gone.”

When the 10-minute timer hits zero, or at the end of an untimed shoot, everyone involved is completely spent.

The results of a Matter shoot are stunning and so absurd that viewers often declare with certainty that the subject must be Photoshopped into the background, because there's no way those images could have truly have existed. And yet, the doubters are wrong. Every image is true.

To reach Julia Ben-Asher, call 970-871-4229 or email jbenasher@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @JuliaBenAsher.

More photos shot in Steamboat Springs

(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
(Photo by Jordan Matter)
]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/MATTER-SBT-031419.7-325x217.jpg
Half-naked men take a spin: The Record for Tuesday, March 12, 2019 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/half-naked-men-take-a-spin-the-record-for-tuesday-march-12-2019/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:56:15 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334177 Tuesday, March 12, 2019 7:57 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers were called about a raccoon that got its head stuck in a bottle near a church in the 500 block of Oak Street. Officers were unable to find any raccoons in the area. 8:30 a.m. Officers […]]]>

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

7:57 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers were called about a raccoon that got its head stuck in a bottle near a church in the 500 block of Oak Street. Officers were unable to find any raccoons in the area.

8:30 a.m. Officers received a call about a car that was reversing and hit the side of a building in the 900 block of Crawford Avenue.

8:58 a.m. A resident in the 400 block of Tamarack Drive called officers after a neighbor's dog bit her.

Crime Stoppers

If you have information about any unsolved crime, contact Routt County Crime Stoppers. You will remain anonymous and could earn a cash reward.

Submit a tip
• Call: 970-870-6226
• Click: TipSubmit.com
• Text: Send “NAMB” and your message to 274637

9:19 a.m. Officers received a call from the Routt County Jail about an inmate requesting help with an injury.

10:49 a.m. Officers were called about a dog hanging around some dumpsters near a church in the 500 block of Oak Street.

3:20 p.m. A man called officers to report criminal mischief at a park in the 10 block of 12th Street. His wife had driven to the park earlier in the day, and when she returned home, she noticed a pile of small rocks on the top of her car and a crack in the windshield. The man believes that someone at the park was throwing rocks at the car and damaged the windshield.

4:13 p.m. Officers were called about a suspicious incident at JD Hays Way and South Lincoln Avenue. Someone was reportedly pushing a man inside a wheel in and out of traffic, neither of whom were completely dressed.

6:34 p.m. Routt County Sheriff's Office deputies assisted a driver whose car got stuck in a ditch along U.S. Highway 40 near Hayden.

7:11 p.m. Officers were called about a suspicious person outside a marijuana dispensary in the 2000 block of Curve Plaza. A man who missed a bus heading out of town was standing outside the dispensary and a liquor store, asking people to buy him marijuana or alcohol. He was old enough to buy them himself, but he did not have his ID.

11:45 p.m. Officers were called about a suspicious person near a parking lot in the 1100 block of Bangtail Way. A man was walking through the parking lot when a person wearing a sweatshirt suddenly emerged from the shadows and scared the man. He told officers that he was especially worried because he had heard a rumor earlier in the day that a bounty hunter was in Steamboat searching for two escaped convicts.

Total incidents: 51

  • Steamboat officers had 25 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Routt County deputies had 14 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue firefighters responded to 11 calls for service.
  • West Routt Fire Protection District firefighters responded to one call for service.

The Record offers a glimpse of police activity and is not a comprehensive report of all police activity. Calls such as domestic violence, sexual assaults and juvenile situations typically do not appear in The Record.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/The-Record_logo-325x192.jpg
Steamboat Springs grocery stores will not be affected by potential strike https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-springs-grocery-stores-will-not-be-affected-by-potential-strike/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:51:25 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334172 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Workers at more than 80 City Market and King Soopers stores across Colorado will vote Thursday and Friday on whether to accept a contract offer from City Market and King Soopers or authorize a strike. But customers who get their groceries at […]]]>
The Steamboat Springs and Craig City Market stores are “union free,” and will not be impacted if members of the union that represents grocery workers at more than 80 King Soopers and City Market stores in other parts of the state vote to authorize a strike later this week. (Photo by John F. Russell)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Workers at more than 80 City Market and King Soopers stores across Colorado will vote Thursday and Friday on whether to accept a contract offer from City Market and King Soopers or authorize a strike.

But customers who get their groceries at the stores in Steamboat Springs and Craig can rest easy. Those stores are "union free" and will not be impacted, according to City Market spokesperson Adam Williamson.

"It's going to be business as usual, for sure, in your area," Williamson said Wednesday morning. "They are union free — both Steamboat Springs and Craig."

But he said that is not the case more than 80 of the 152 City Market and King Soopers stores in Colorado where workers are represented by UFCW Local 7. Union members who work for City Market and King Soopers, which are owned by Kroger Co., will vote to either accept the offer in front of them, or vote to authorize a strike. A strike authorization doesn't mean that workers will walk of the job immediately, Williamson explained.

"Authorizing a strike is a difficult decision for any worker, " UFCW Local President Kim Cordova said in a news release. “… But we are committed to making King Soopers and City Marker a better place to both work and shop. We remain hopeful that the company will come to the table with an offer that provides King Soopers and City Market workers with benefits they have earned and deserve."

The current contract ended on Jan. 12, and UFCW Local 7 and City Market and King Soopers have been engaged in bargaining for new contracts since December. The union, which represents more than 12,000 workers in Colorado, is unhappy with the company's latest proposals, which the union claims will make workers wait up to 10 years to get paid sick leave.

Union leaders also say the new contract means no pay raises over the next three years for half of the employees, decreased benefits, increased cost for health care, fewer full-time jobs and fewer hours for part-time workers.

To reach John F. Russell, call 970-871-4209, email jrussell@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @Framp1966.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/CityMarket-sbt-031419-1x-325x197.jpg
Atmos Energy reminds customers to protect gas meters from snow, ice https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/atmos-energy-reminds-customers-to-protect-gas-meters-from-snow-ice/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:30:19 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334174 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — With the recent snow accumulation, Atmos Energy is reminding customers to please keep the areas above and around natural gas meters clear of snow and ice. Buildup of snow or ice can cause significant damage to gas meters and external pipes, in […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — With the recent snow accumulation, Atmos Energy is reminding customers to please keep the areas above and around natural gas meters clear of snow and ice.

Buildup of snow or ice can cause significant damage to gas meters and external pipes, in addition to impacting the accuracy of meter readings and preventing quick access to meters in case of an emergency.

To remove snow and ice from meters, pipes and vents:

  • Carefully hand dig snow from around the meter and/or use a broom to sweep off the snow.
  • Do not allow snow to accumulate on a roof that is directly over a gas meter.
  • If using snow and ice removal equipment on rooftops, use extreme caution while diverting it away from the meter.
  • Do not allow snow or ice to pile up against the meter when snow plowing or shoveling a yard or street.

For additional winter safety tips, visit atmosenergy.com/wintersafety. As a reminder, if you smell natural gas, leave the area immediately and then call 911 or the 24-hour emergency number at 1-866-322-8667.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/atmos_6-20-275x325.jpg
LIVE UPDATES: March blizzard closes US Highway 40 over Rabbit Ears Pass https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/live-updates-march-blizzard-closes-us-highway-40-over-rabbit-ears-pass/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:25:14 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334195 Here are the latest Northwest Colorado road closures and weather updates. This story will be updated as more information becomes available. 1:58 p.m. Colorado Mountain College Steamboat Springs will be closing at 3 p.m. Wednesday. It will reopen with regular hours Thursday. 1:57 p.m. Yampa Valley […]]]>
U.S. Highway 40 over Rabbit Ears Pass has been closed. See more webcam images.

Here are the latest Northwest Colorado road closures and weather updates. This story will be updated as more information becomes available.

1:58 p.m. Colorado Mountain College Steamboat Springs will be closing at 3 p.m. Wednesday. It will reopen with regular hours Thursday.

1:57 p.m. Yampa Valley Electric Association reports it has restored power to the following areas: Catamount, Humble Road and Hamilton. Power remains out in the Old Fish area of Steamboat and Maybell, which is inaccessible due to road closures.

1:36 p.m. Denver International Airport is closed.

12:56 p.m. Colorado Highway 13 is closed south of Craig to Meeker.

12:48 p.m. Interstate 70 is closed between Vail and Copper Mountain for avalanche control.

12:45 p.m. U.S. Highway 40 is closed over Berthoud Pass for avalanche control.

12:03 p.m. U.S. Highway 40 is closed from Steamboat to Kremmling and Craig to the Utah boarder because of adverse road conditions and crashes.

Weather

Keep up with the conditions:

• Find the latest forecast and recent weather stories here.
• View Steamboat webcams here.
• Find information from the National Weather Service, including storm warnings and advisories at wrh.noaa.gov
• The Colorado Department of Transportation provides road conditions, closures and traffic cameras at cotrip.org.
• For travel information by phone, call 511 (in Colorado) or dial 303-639-1111.
• Find information about avalanche danger and conditions from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.
• For flight information, visit flightview.com/traveltools.

11:52 a.m. Colorado Highway 14 from the east base of Rabbit Ears Pass to Walden is closed. Head to CoTrip.org for the latest road conditions.

11:49 a.m. Yampa Valley Electric Association is experiencing some outages in Northwest Colorado, including Maybell. See an updated map of affected areas here.

All day: The Yampa Valley is under a winter weather advisory until midnight Wednesday. Winds gusting over 30 mph will cause blowing and drifting snow. View the latest NOAA forecast here.

Storms expected to pummel Colorado on Wednesday making travel ‘impossible,’ powder day imminent

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Road_closure_1-28-325x231.jpg
Parkinson’s disease support group held monthly https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/parkinsons-disease-support-group-held-monthly-2/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 17:30:14 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334173 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A support group for people living with Parkinson's disease is held from 5 to 6 p.m. the second Monday of every month at Hampton Inn & Suites, 725 S. Lincoln Ave. The group is hosted by Yampa Valley Parkinson’s Support Network and […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A support group for people living with Parkinson's disease is held from 5 to 6 p.m. the second Monday of every month at Hampton Inn & Suites, 725 S. Lincoln Ave. The group is hosted by Yampa Valley Parkinson’s Support Network and Northwest Colorado Health.

Discussions often include guest speakers and focus on quality-of-life issues, research updates and living well with Parkinson's disease. For more information, contact Adrienne Idsal at 970-367-3435 or ahearne@northwestcoloradohealth.org.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/YampaValleyHealth2_logo-325x192.jpg
Lunch and learn to focus on building green teams https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/lunch-and-learn-to-focus-on-building-green-teams/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 16:30:20 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334150 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Community members interested in starting, growing or rejuvenating a green team are invited to a free lunch and learn titled How to Build Your Organization's Green Team, at noon Thursday, March 21, in the Routt County Commissioners Hearing Room, 522 Lincoln Ave. […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Community members interested in starting, growing or rejuvenating a green team are invited to a free lunch and learn titled How to Build Your Organization's Green Team, at noon Thursday, March 21, in the Routt County Commissioners Hearing Room, 522 Lincoln Ave. in downtown Steamboat Springs.

The event is hosted by the Yampa Valley Sustainability Council and educators from Golden-based McKinstry. Attendees will learn how to engage employees, colleagues or students to work toward sustainability goals such as waste diversion, energy efficiency, water conservation, greener transportation or environmentally oriented community service projects.

Everyone is welcome to attend, but an RSVP is required for the free lunch. For more information or to RSVP, visit yvsc.org.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/TalkingGreen_logo-325x192.jpg
Routt County adoptable pets: Walnut and Mandan the cats https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/routt-county-adoptable-pets-walnut-and-mandan-the-cats/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 16:30:06 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334073 Walnut is a 1-year-old, tortoiseshell, domestic shorthair cat, weighing about 6 pounds. She's ready to find a quiet, loving home to blossom in. This beauty was feral when she arrived at the shelter, but with lots of attention and love, she has begun to come […]]]>

Walnut is a 1-year-old, tortoiseshell, domestic shorthair cat, weighing about 6 pounds. She's ready to find a quiet, loving home to blossom in. This beauty was feral when she arrived at the shelter, but with lots of attention and love, she has begun to come out of her shell. Although still a bit shy, Walnut will now seek attention and purr while getting petted.

Mandan is a 1-year-old, domestic shorthair cat, weighing about 6 pounds. She came to the shelter as a feral cat from McCoy, Colorado. Although very shy when she first arrived, this pretty girl is warming up quickly to people and does occasionally seek attention. She gets along well with other cats, and with some TLC and patience, we think she'll blossom into a great furry best friend.

For more information about Walnut, Mandan and other adoptable pets, call the Routt County Humane Society at 970-879-7247 or visit RouttHumane.org.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/pets-1-325x195.jpg
Steamboat police to resume fingerprinting services March 18 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-police-to-resume-fingerprinting-services-march-18/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 15:30:56 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334135 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Springs Police Department has received final approval as an IdentoGO vendor location for fingerprinting services. IdentoGO is one of two state-approved vendors for these services. "It's important for us to be able to serve our local community," police Cmdr. Jerry […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Springs Police Department has received final approval as an IdentoGO vendor location for fingerprinting services. IdentoGO is one of two state-approved vendors for these services.

"It's important for us to be able to serve our local community," police Cmdr. Jerry Stabile was quoted as saying in a news release. "Our goal throughout this transition has always been to provide an option for local fingerprinting services, and we're happy to be back at it later this month."

Applicants wanting to visit the local police department for fingerprinting will begin the process by visiting the Colorado CABS website at colorado.gov/pacific/cbi/updated-employment-background-checks. From there, select the reason for your background check from the list of options.

This section also will provide the fee associated for the specific fingerprinting requirement. At this point, applicants should select IdentoGO by IDEMIA, which will then redirect them to IdentoGO's webpage to setup an appointment.

Starting March 18, IdentoGO will be at the Steamboat Police Department from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and will follow the same observed holidays as the city. There is a vendor-processing fee of $10 per applicant plus the state and FBI fees, if required.

Applicants should visit identogo.com or call IdentoGO's customer service line at 844-539-5539 for more information.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Crime-and-courts2_logo-325x192.jpg
Best of the Boat pharmacy: Lyon Corner Drug & Soda Fountain https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/best-of-the-boat-pharmacy-lyon-corner-drug-soda-fountain/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 15:00:42 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=328033 This year, Lyon Drug at 840 Lincoln Ave. celebrates its 100th year of operation, all in the same location — enough to make it rise to the top of anyone's list. Founded in 1920 as Chamberlain Gray before adopting the Lyon family name in 1946, […]]]>
Lyon’s Corner Drug & Soda Fountain won this year’s Best Pharmacy award. (Photo by Matt Stensland)

This year, Lyon Drug at 840 Lincoln Ave. celebrates its 100th year of operation, all in the same location — enough to make it rise to the top of anyone's list.

For more

Find complete 2018 Best of the Boat results here.

Founded in 1920 as Chamberlain Gray before adopting the Lyon family name in 1946, Lyon was sold by 37-year owners Tom and Nancy Clapsaddle to pharmacists Jen Campbell and Wendy Lyon, who are carrying on its winning tradition of local ownership and friendly customer service.

“We have a lot of loyal customers,” Lyon said, crediting the staff for the accolades. “We’ve been here for a very long time and appreciate everyone’s loyalty.”

Bonus: an old-fashioned ice cream counter where you can load up on ice cream floats, cones and old-fashioned sodas.

Best Pharmacy

• Winner: Lyon Corner Drug & Soda Fountain

• Runners-up: Walgreens and City Market

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/lyon_3-18-243x325.jpg
Elaine Dermody: Residents need to voice opinion on 2A trail funds https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/elaine-dermody-residents-need-to-voice-opinion-on-2a-trail-funds/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 13:30:01 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334131 I urge residents to read "Council to discuss excess 2A trails tax money plans" in the March 12 edition of the Steamboat Pilot & Today. There has been public discussion on the pros and cons of the Mad Rabbit Project, but I feel less on […]]]>
I urge residents to read "Council to discuss excess 2A trails tax money plans" in the March 12 edition of the Steamboat Pilot & Today. There has been public discussion on the pros and cons of the Mad Rabbit Project, but I feel less on the many alternative uses for the tax funds.
As usual, funding decisions require difficult choices. I would prefer to see the funds used to expand the Core Trail and build indoor pickleball courts. However, the purpose of my letter is not to gain support for my wishes but to encourage residents to make their wishes known. By the way, you can find some worthwhile facts at http://www.KeepRouttWild.com.
Elaine Dermody
Steamboat Springs
]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Routt County in photos: March 12, 2019 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/routt-county-in-photos-march-12-2019/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 04:53:05 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334162 Check out our latest photos from readers in and across Routt County, and submit your own to share@SteamboatPilot.com. See more photos at SteamboatPilot.com/photos/galleries.]]>

Check out our latest photos from readers in and across Routt County, and submit your own to share@SteamboatPilot.com. See more photos at SteamboatPilot.com/photos/galleries.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Flowers-sbt-031319-1x-1-325x205.jpg
Our view: Council should focus on planning transparency https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/our-view-council-should-focus-on-planning-transparency/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 04:44:27 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334124 We believe there's always opportunity to streamline government processes, but in the case of giving the Steamboat Springs Planning Commission more authority on planning decisions, we'd ask Steamboat Springs City Council to proceed cautiously. As we've witnessed with the recent Pine Grove Road hotel decision […]]]>

We believe there's always opportunity to streamline government processes, but in the case of giving the Steamboat Springs Planning Commission more authority on planning decisions, we'd ask Steamboat Springs City Council to proceed cautiously.

As we've witnessed with the recent Pine Grove Road hotel decision and approval of the 1125 Lincoln Avenue project in 2017, which was ultimately overturned in court, these development projects are of high interest to local citizens and need to be handled as openly and transparently as possible, giving community members every opportunity to have their voices heard.

Fundamentally, we don't like the idea of transferring decision-making power and accountability from an elected body to an appointed body. City Council is answerable to the public through the election process, and moving certain decisions to Planning Commission appears, on the surface, to be restricting citizen access rather than expanding it.

At a glance

At issue: Steamboat Springs City Council is considering giving the Planning Commission authority to make certain planning decisions.

Our View: Council should hit the brakes and work on ensuring the decision making is as open, transparent and accountable as possible before transferring any power to an appointed commission.

Editorial Board
• Logan Molen, publisher
• Lisa Schlichtman, editor
• Robin Stone, community representative
• Steve Hofman, community representative

Contact the Editorial Board at 970-871-4221 or lschlichtman@
SteamboatPilot.com
.

Before any action is taken, the city first needs to focus on improving public outreach and strengthening public notice procedures to ensure citizens are more aware of the applications coming up for consideration. Citizens also seem more inclined to offer public comment at council meetings, and so, the city would need to educate the public on how the Planning Commission functions and how citizens could have a voice in the process at that level.

Council member Sonja Macys suggested that if Planning Commission members are granted more authority, there needs to be increased transparency in the appointment process, and we agree.

Currently, the council interviews potential candidates before making appointments to Planning Commission, but as Macys noted, the public rarely attends the interview sessions. She and other council members indicated they would be open to holding the interviews in a more public meeting space to provide an opportunity for citizen scrutiny of the process, which we think would be a good move.

A clear path for removing someone from the commission must also be established, and we'd like to see adoption of a common sense conflict of interest policy to increase public trust in the decisions being made by the commissioners, who would no longer just be making recommendations to council. There also should be some consideration given to imposing term or year limits for commission members.

We appreciate the expertise of the city planning staff and the work they do to guide development in the city, but at this point in time, we don't think more decision-making authority should be transferred from the council to the Planning Commission until more work is done to ensure the public understands clearly how to engage proactively and effectively in the planning process before final decisions are made.

The council is slated to revisit this issue at its March 19 meeting, so if citizens have an opinion on whether or not Planning Commission's authority to approve planning applications should be expanded, now's the time to make your voices heard.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/OurView_logo-325x192.jpg
Alpine U14 Championships a mini Olympics for Rocky and Central region skiers https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/alpine-u14-championships-a-mini-olympics-for-rocky-and-central-region-skiers/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 02:36:30 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334156 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Some of the youngest, most elite Alpine skiers were testing their edges at Steamboat Resort on Tuesday. For the third year in a row, Steamboat Springs is hosting the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Rocky/Central U14 Championships, a four-day competition that showcases the […]]]>
Steamboat Springs ski racer Jordan Simon clears a gate near the bottom of the slalom course during USSA Rocky Mountain/Central U14 Alpine Skiing Championships at Howelsen Hill. (File photo by John F. Russell)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Some of the youngest, most elite Alpine skiers were testing their edges at Steamboat Resort on Tuesday.

For the third year in a row, Steamboat Springs is hosting the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Rocky/Central U14 Championships, a four-day competition that showcases the top 12- to 14-year-old Alpine ski racers in the country.

“This is the youngest age where the kids come all together as an entire region of 18 states,” Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club Associate Executive Director Jon Nolting said. “It's their first taste of the big time. We're trying to make this like the Olympics for the kids. Out of the 195 kids competing, chances are one of these kids will be in the Olympics one day. But for the other 190, this might be their only shot at feeling like that.”

Schedule of events

Wednesday, March 13
7 p.m. Opening Ceremonies, Howelsen Hill

Thursday, March 14, Super-G
10 a.m. Girls Super-G race, All Out, Steamboat Resort
11:30 a.m. Boys Super-G race, All Out, Steamboat Resort
1:15 p.m. Super-G Awards Presentation, Gondola Square Stage, Steamboat Resort

Friday, March 15, Giant Slalom
9:15 a.m. Boys Giant Slalom Race No. 1, All Out, Steamboat Resort
10:30 a.m. Girls Giant Slalom Race No. 1, All Out, Steamboat Resort
1 p.m. Boys Giant Slalom Race No. 2, All Out, Steamboat Resort
2:15 p.m. Girls Giant Slalom Race No. 2, All Out, Steamboat Resort
3:45 p.m. Giant Slalom Awards Presentation, Gondola Square Stage, Steamboat Resort

Saturday, March 16, Parallel Slalom
12:45 p.m. Round of 16, Howelsen Hill face
1:15 p.m. Quarterfinals, Howelsen Hill face
1:30 p.m. Semifinal and Final rounds, Howelsen Hill face
2:45 p.m. Duals Awards Presentation, Howelsen Hill

Sunday, March 17, Slalom
9 a.m. Girls Slalom Race No. 1, Howelsen Hill face
10 a.m. Boys Slalom Race No. 1, Howelsen Hill face
12:30 p.m. Girls Slalom Race No. 2, Howelsen Hill face
1:30 p.m. Boys Slalom Race No. 2, Howelsen Hill face
3 p.m. Overall and Slalom Awards Presentation, Howelsen Hill

The competition, which consists of Super-G, giant slalom, parallel slalom and slalom competitions split between Steamboat Resort and Howelsen Hill, paints the stage of a mini-Olympics.

Events kick off at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 13, with Opening Ceremonies, complete with fireworks.

This is the first event for athletes younger than 14 that requires a form of qualification, meaning it’s an accomplishment to even make it to the championships.

The Winter Sports Club doesn’t like to put emphasis on skiers’ performance at such a young age but wants to provide an atmosphere that motivates skiers to continue in the sport and reach for the highest levels.

“It's great to be really good now, but if you're not on that podium and you keep working hard, then your time will come,” Nolting said “There are some kids from this group who will go to the Olympics, just can't tell who.”

Nolting said there were good skiers who didn’t qualify for the championships, and at this age, a common disadvantage can also be the physical size of the skier. To account for the gravitational disadvantage, an award called the “little ripper” is given to the fastest skier at under 95 pounds.

The Rocky/Central U14 Championships consists of skiers from 16 states, and part of the fun is seeing skiers from different places and how they measure up against the competition.

“There's an element to it that's extremely overwhelming,” Winter Sports Club Alpine director Adam Chadbourne said about hosting the competition. “Steamboat Resort is a wonderful partner in the event. They really step up their efforts and host a lot of families.”

The Winter Sports Club will have 11 ski racers competing, including Audra Gowdy, Adi Lage, Karenna Westermeyer, Rylee McLouth, Jonah Fleischer, Dawson Holmes, Jeremy Nolting, Alex Orozco, Fisher St. John, Jack Fox and Spencer Richeda.

“It's super exciting, especially being on our home hill and hosting this big event,” Winter Sports Club U14 Alpine head coach Michael Britton said.

Athletes will participate in official training on Wednesday, and competition kicks off at 10 a.m. Thursday, March 14, with the Super-G at Steamboat Resort.

“We really want to showcase what the Winter Sports Club is all about,” Britton said. “The community factor is so big. The community comes out and supports the race whether or not they support the racer.”

To reach Leah Vann, call 970-871-4253, email lvann@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @LVann_Sports.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/032117_Skiing_Simon_1-325x199.jpg
Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club U16 Alpine team sends 8 skiers to nationals after junior championship finishes https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-springs-winter-sports-club-u16-alpine-team-sends-8-skiers-to-nationals-after-junior-championship-finishes/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 02:08:39 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334129 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club sent 16 Alpine skiers to the U16 Rock Central Junior Championships at Winter Park Ski Resort last week, and of the 16 who competed, eight qualified for the U16 Nationals in Breckenridge. Qualifiers included Ryli Grosdidier, […]]]>
The U16 overall mens and womens podium finishers, from left, are Vail’s Emma Resnick, Steamboat Springs’ Jordan Simon, Steamboat Springs’ Cooper Puckett, Steamboat Springs’ Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat Springs’ Tyler Thomas and Aspen’s Stella Johansson. (Courtesy photo)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club sent 16 Alpine skiers to the U16 Rock Central Junior Championships at Winter Park Ski Resort last week, and of the 16 who competed, eight qualified for the U16 Nationals in Breckenridge.

Qualifiers included Ryli Grosdidier, Marissa Drobek, Natalia Tatge, Caroline Gilchrist, Cooper Puckett, Jordan Simon, Tyler Thomas and Nick Orfanakis.

The boys swept four of the podiums. Maren Elvidge won the overall Bibo award for moving up the most spots combined from all events of any female, and Charles Welch won the Bibo award in the downhill and slalom divisions.

Puckett won the men’s overall category after winning the downhill, Super-G, super combined and slalom races.

Simon came in second overall overall on the men’s side after top three placings in downhill, Super-G and super combined while also winning the giant slalom. Thomas came in third overall to sweep the men’s overall podium.

Grosdidier was crowned first in the overall women’s podium. She finished second in downhill, super-combined and giant slalom, followed by a third place in Super-G and fifth place in slalom.

Drobek came in sixth overall in the women’s overall category.

Results

U16 Rocky/Central men’s overall podium
1. Cooper Puckett, Steamboat
2. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
3. Tyler Thomas, Steamboat
U16 Rocky/Central women’s overall podium
1. Ryli Grosdidier, Steamboat
2. Emma Resnick, Vail
3. Stella Johansson, Aspen
6. Marissa Drobek, Steamboat
Men’s downhill
1. Cooper Puckett, Steamboat
2. Tyler Thomas, Steamboat
3. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
Women’s downhill
1. Zoie Palmer, Vail
2. Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat
3. Stella Johansson, Aspen
4. Marissa Drobek, Steamboat
5. Caroline Gilchrist, Steamboat
Men’s Super-G
1. Cooper Puckett, Steamboat
2. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
3. Tyler Thomas, Steamboat
Women’s Super-G
1. Emma Resnick, Vail
2. Stella Johansson, Aspen
3. Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat
4. Marissa Drobek, Steamboat
7. Natalia Tatge, Steamboat
Men’s super combined
1. Cooper Puckett, Steamboat
2. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
3. Tyler Thomas, Steamboat
9. Nick Orfanakis, Steamboat
Women’s super combined
1. Emma Resnick, Vail
2. Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat
3. Stella Johansson, Aspen
5. Marissa Drobek, Steamboat
9. Natalia Tatge, Steamboat
Men’s giant slalom
1. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
2. Toby Scarpella, Vail
3. Tanner Grant, Vail
4. Tyler Thomas, Steamboat
Women’s giant slalom
1. Bayli McSpadden, Vail
2. Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat
3. Kjersti Moritz, Vail
7. Natalia Tatge, Steamboat
Men’s slalom
1. Cooper Puckett, Steamboat
2. Adam Berghult, Buck Hill
3. Appollo Powell, Vail
4. Alex Deubel, Heiliger, Wisconsin
5. Jordan Simon, Steamboat
Women’s slalom
1. Emma Resnick, Vail
2. Stella Johansson, Aspen
3. Bayli McSpadden, Vail
4. Peyton Servais, Buck Hill, Minnesota
5. Riley Grosdidier, Steamboat

Recommended Stories For You

To reach Leah Vann, call 970-871-4253, email lvann@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @LVann_Sports.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/sportsbriefs-sbt-031319-1-309x325.jpg
Storms expected to pummel Colorado on Wednesday making travel ‘impossible,’ powder day imminent https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/storms-expected-to-pummel-colorado-on-wednesday-making-travel-impossible-powder-day-imminent/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 01:56:12 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334155 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A massive storm is expected to pound the entire state Wednesday, bringing blizzard conditions to the Front Range and significant snowfall to the Steamboat Springs area. On Wednesday, a moist, warm system moving in from the southwest will mix with a strong, cold […]]]>
A Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club athlete cuts through powder on the face of Howelsen Hill in 2017. (File photo by Joel Reichenberger)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A massive storm is expected to pound the entire state Wednesday, bringing blizzard conditions to the Front Range and significant snowfall to the Steamboat Springs area.

On Wednesday, a moist, warm system moving in from the southwest will mix with a strong, cold storm from the Gulf of Alaska, and it’s forecasted to create a zone of low pressure equivalent to that of a Category 2 hurricane.

Weather

Keep up with the conditions:

• Find the latest forecast and recent weather stories here.
• View Steamboat webcams here.
• Find information from the National Weather Service, including storm warnings and advisories at wrh.noaa.gov
• The Colorado Department of Transportation provides road conditions, closures and traffic cameras at cotrip.org.
• For travel information by phone, call 511 (in Colorado) or dial 303-639-1111.
• Find information about avalanche danger and conditions from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.
• For flight information, visit flightview.com/traveltools.

"It’s actually fairly rare to have such a strong storm west of the Mississippi," said local meteorologist Mike Weissbluth, who runs snowalarm.com.

On the ground, this is expected to create blizzard conditions on the Front Range and eastern plains. Many metro-area schools, colleges and churches had already announced closures Tuesday night.

"Travel (Wednesday) is going to be difficult or impossible," Weissbluth said. "It's going to be worse the closer you get to the Front Range."

He likened the collision of storm systems to a scene in the 1984 film Ghostbusters, when the Ghostbusters trio is chasing their initial ghost, Slimer.

"Remember they talked about when the streams meet? They both have the ray guns, and they’re like 'don’t cross the streams,’ Weissbluth said. “I’m looking at the atmosphere here, and we basically have a crossing of the streams. Whenever I look at this, that's what I think of."

But worry not. Weissbluth said Steamboat likely won't have to defeat a giant marshmallow man, but "we'll probably have giant powder puffs."

While the bulk of the storm — and the snow — is forecasted to hit the other side of the Continental Divide, Weissbluth is calling for 6 to 12 inches of snow on the mountain by Thursday morning, with several more inches of snowfall after Steamboat Resort's 5 a.m. snow report.

"Even though the center of (the storm) is over southeastern Colorado, we're going to feel strong winds," he said. "It appears after the front comes through in the morning, we'll have northwest winds turning to northerly and then perhaps even northeasterly as the storm spins up the Front Range."

Depending on how the storm swings, it could lift some moisture from the Gulf of Mexico over the mountains to create even heavier snowfall in Steamboat, he said.

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center forecasted considerable avalanche danger at all elevations in the Steamboat Springs area Wednesday. The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory for Routt County through Wednesday night.

"For those who are winter weary, there is good news behind this storm," he said.

He's forecasting cold temperatures Thursday. A possible inversion Friday morning will likely keep those temperatures down before some sunshine warms the area up again.

"It does look like we do have a break in the winter weather that will last into mid next week at this point," he said.

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/010617_WILD_Howelsen1-325x227.jpg
Steamboat’s Jett Seymour wins NCAA title while balancing both U.S. and University of Denver ski teams https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboats-jett-seymour-wins-ncaa-title-while-balancing-both-u-s-and-university-of-denver-ski-teams/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 01:51:11 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334146 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Friday, March 8, Steamboat Springs native Jett Seymour cruised down the slalom course in Stowe, Vermont, at blazing speed to capture his first-ever NCAA title as a sophomore representing the University of Denver. It was his third All-American finish at the […]]]>
Denver University sophomore and Steamboat Springs native Jett Seymour won the NCAA national title in slalom on Friday, March 8, in Stowe, Vermont. (Photo courtesy of Tania Coffey)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Friday, March 8, Steamboat Springs native Jett Seymour cruised down the slalom course in Stowe, Vermont, at blazing speed to capture his first-ever NCAA title as a sophomore representing the University of Denver.

It was his third All-American finish at the NCAA National Championships. His season also included a 10th place finish at the Junior World Championships.

Seymour is making strides as an elite athlete at both the professional and collegiate levels. Unlike many Alpine professional skiers, he steps off the mountain to hit the books. He has finals to study for at the University of Denver, where he is majoring in international business and finance.

“Basically, when I'm not skiing, I'm studying,” Seymour said. “I just have to make do with what I have and be the most efficient as possible. On a plane ride instead of watching a movie, hammering out a paper or reading a book I have to read, finding every little moment to do homework.”

Seymour is a member of the U.S. Ski Team and the University of Denver ski team, paving the way as one of few athletes who prove they can do both.

“Denver was the only place that recruited me,” Seymour said. “It was my top school, and the fact that they offered me a spot, it was a dream come true.”

“To have such a young athlete come here straight out of high school, I knew there would be learning curves and growing pains, but when you look at what he's done, you're looking at somebody that wants to make a mark on more than skiing,” Denver University Alpine coach Andy LeRoy said. “You can do this from college and be the best ski racer in the world. That mentality is something he is bringing to our team and the circuit.”

In the past, LeRoy said competing at the collegiate level was a sign an athlete was giving up on their World Cup dreams. Even as high school students, athletes travel so much that he believes they’re lucky to walk out of high school with a sophomore-level education.

When he first recruited Seymour, who was coming off a NorAm race win ranked No. 1 in the world in his age group for slalom skiing, the coach wanted to convince Seymour it was possible to be an elite skier and receive a top-notch education.

“There’s no reason that student athletes can’t receive a college education while competing on the national team,” LeRoy said. “It just hasn't been happening.”

There are requirements to meet as both a professional and collegiate skier.

As a collegiate skier, Seymour had to compete in at least two slalom and two giant slalom races, meaning two weekends of collegiate racing. The problem with competing in just the minimum number of races is skiers limit their chances of reaching a podium and qualifying for the NCAA Championships. Seymour competed in eight of 12 possible collegiate races this year to earn his spot.

As a member of the U.S. Ski Team, Seymour was committed to competing in the Junior World Championships and a number of NorAm cup races to maintain points to remain a competitor while also attempting to amass enough points to earn a World Cup spot.

“Last year, I think with the added stress of school and it being my first year, learning the new coaches, how the team operates on the road was new to me,” Seymour said. “Communication between the University of Denver team and U.S. Ski Team had to be so high, and there was a lot of mix-ups, which created some issues. And this year, I was a little more organized with my planning, knowing where I was going, when and for how long, so I could talk to my teachers.”

The thrill of racing down a course with a crowd cheering for him is what drives Seymour’s love for the sport, but the team aspect of collegiate racing is also something he values.

The University of Denver ski team did not podium as a team this year due to tough competition on the Nordic side, but Seymour saw his teammate Simon Fournier take second in the giant slalom just two days before his title. As top-five placers, the University of Denver named Seymour, Fournier and Tobias Kogler, whom took fifth in giant slalom, first-team All-Americans in Alpine skiing this year.

“When you're in your start gate, you have 11 other athletes that are pulling for you, and your coaches are pulling for you, and everything matters,” Seymour said. “You get butterflies for your teammates coming down — compared to when you have butterflies for yourself coming out of the start gate. It's refreshing for an individual sport.”

Four days after his NCAA title, Seymour was back on the slopes on Tuesday, March 12, at a NorAm cup race at Burke Mountain in Vermont. He estimates he has 10 races left this season.

“Jett skis at such a high level, he can win the next Olympics,” LeRoy said. “He was with the national team when he got to me and, hopefully, will be with the national team when he leaves me. I'm just happy to be a step along the way.”

To reach Leah Vann, call 970-871-4253, email lvann@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @LVann_Sports.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/seymour-sbt-031319-325x217.jpg
Tiny home complex in Milner 1 step closer to reality after commissioners OK plan, with conditions https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/tiny-home-complex-in-milner-1-step-closer-to-reality-after-commissioners-ok-plan-with-conditions/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 00:59:09 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334139 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Members of the Routt County Board of Commissioners on Tuesday approved a conceptual plan and subdivision that would bring six tiny homes to unincorporated Milner, just off U.S. Highway 40, about 10 miles west of Steamboat Springs. That decision elicited a stir of disapproval […]]]>
About 30 people, most of them Milner residents, attended the Routt County Board of Commissioners meeting Tuesday to weigh in on a plan that would bring six tiny homes to the town. (Photo by Derek Maiolo)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Members of the Routt County Board of Commissioners on Tuesday approved a conceptual plan and subdivision that would bring six tiny homes to unincorporated Milner, just off U.S. Highway 40, about 10 miles west of Steamboat Springs.

That decision elicited a stir of disapproval from about 30 people in the audience, most of them Milner residents, who attended the meeting to protest the plan.

Michael Buccino, a Steamboat resident and owner of Micro Living LLC, has been spearheading the Cheney Creek Tiny Homes project he presented to the commissioners Tuesday. He had a markedly different reaction following the decision.

"I'm elated," he said.

Buccino has spent the past year working toward establishing a tiny home community in Routt County to provide more affordable housing and to show such communities can be a viable option for small families.

He made sure to clarify that Tuesday's approval does not guarantee construction of the project. Rather, commissioners voted that the conceptual plan meets the county's building and zoning codes.

They gave their approval on several conditions, some of which include requirements for snow removal, parking restrictions and a hydrological survey of the Milner area.

A contentious issue

The plan passed on a 2-1 vote, with Commissioner Doug Monger opposing the number of houses slated for construction. He believed constructing four tiny homes on the lot would be more manageable. He also echoed concerns from the public about how the proposed development could change the rural character of Milner and stress the area's limited resources.

Alan Goldich, a planner with Routt County, said current zoning regulations would allow the construction of two larger, more traditional homes on the property.

Buccino's plan includes six homes, each of them less than 400 square feet, arranged around a rectangular, 2,900-square-foot common space. Each home would have a full kitchen and bathroom as well as a loft for a bed and storage.

Buccino envisions the homes’ potential inhabitants to be younger, single people wanting a cheap house or older couples looking to downsize. His plans differ from many other tiny home projects in that people could buy the land on which each home sits.

He referred to other types of tiny homes, most of which have wheels under them, as "glamorized trailers" that do not offer the chance for permanent residency.

He projects the price of each Milner home, along with the land under it, to range from $150,000 to $170,000.

A rendering of one of two tiny home designs that Michael Buccino plans to build in Milner. (Courtesy rendering)

Residents from Milner and across Routt County have opposed the project, sending complaint letters to county officials and submitting a petition to nix the plan. It had 36 signatures by Tuesday, according to Goldich.

Kimberly Waldschmidt was among the Milner residents who made a comment against the project during the commissioners’ meeting Tuesday. She has lived in the town for several years and worries that allowing a cluster of tiny homes would set a precedent for even more high-density housing like apartment complexes.

"If you allow the change for medium-density to high-density, where do you call an end to that?" she asked.

She shared the concerns of other residents who do not want to see the rural character of Milner flooded with new residents and housing developments.

"Those of us who have lived out there for a good number of years did not sign up to live in a high-density community," she said.

Commissioner Tim Corrigan assured the audience that he and his fellow commissioners would not allow this single decision to create a snowball effect.

"When we consider any kind of a land-use application, we look at the cumulative impact," he said. "There would be a limit to the number of these kinds of developments in Milner."

Concerns over water

A primary concern raised by residents and even commissioners was how the six homes would exacerbate water usage in an area that has faced shortages in the past.

Several residents took to the podium to recount tales of their wells drying up after a new neighbor moved in or following an especially dry summer.

The Environmental Protection Agency calculates that the average American household uses more than 300 gallons of water per day.

Buccino expects the water use of each tiny home to be much less than that national average due to the physical limitation of how many people could live there. The homes also would not have a washing machine, which can account for 15 to 40 percent of a household's water usage, according to the Alliance for Water Efficiency.

Commissioner Beth Melton added concerns over water use would be an issue with any construction project in the area.

"We might have the same questions if there were one or two single-family homes being built on this space," she said.

Still, the commissioners approved the conceptual plan on the condition that an expert must conduct a hydrological survey to ensure that the land can handle a spike in water usage.

Buccino agreed to that stipulation but worried that requiring too many tests, some of which he sees as unnecessary for the size and scope of the project, would counteract his goal to keep the tiny houses affordable.

"When we start adding costs, that is just going to add to the price of these homes," he said.

With the commissioners’ approval, Buccino, now, must meet their conditions before submitting a finalized construction plan to the Routt County Planning Commission.

He hopes to submit a finalized plan by the end of April and, if approved by the Planning Commission and the county commissioners, break ground on the site in May.

To reach Derek Maiolo, call 970-871-4247, email dmaiolo@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @derek_maiolo.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Tinyhomes-SBT-031319-325x201.jpg
Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club freeskiers travel to Crested Butte for competition https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-springs-winter-sports-club-freeskiers-travel-to-crested-butte-for-competition/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 00:11:47 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334137 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club freeskiers competed in the Crested Butte International Freeskiers Association National on Friday, March 8, through Sunday, March 10. The competition was hosted on Crested Butte’s steep and heavily forested run called Sock-it-to-Me on the north face of […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club freeskiers competed in the Crested Butte International Freeskiers Association National on Friday, March 8, through Sunday, March 10.

Results

Men
1. Brooks Hudson, Independent
2. Owen Berv, Crested Butte
3. Jennings Heflin, Team Breckenridge
4. Jacob Gilbertson, Steamboat
6. Charlie Greene, Steamboat
14. Bryce Zetzman, Steamboat
15. Alex Spiegel, Steamboat
22. Callum Becvarik, Steamboat
23. August Menetre, Steamboat
34. Axel Kovach, Steamboat

Women
1. Avery Bernholtz, Crested Butte
2. Ella Haverkampf, Crested Butte
3. Charlotte Ulrich, Taos
4. Maisie Wagner, Steamboat

The competition was hosted on Crested Butte’s steep and heavily forested run called Sock-it-to-Me on the north face of the mountain.

Steamboat’s Jacob Gilbertson finished fourth overall, and Charlie Greene finished sixth out of 44 skiers. Bryce Zetzman and Alex Spiegel took 14th and 15th, respectively. Callum Becvarik and August Menetre came in 22nd and 23rd, and Axel Kovach rounded out the Steamboat finishers in 34th place.

Maisie Wagner was the top finisher for Steamboat on the women’s side, taking fourth out of 26 skiers.

To reach Leah Vann, call 970-871-4253, email lvann@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @LVann_Sports.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/SSWSCLogo.png
Steamboat Springs High School hockey players receive all-conference, all-state honors https://www.steamboatpilot.com/sports-outdoors/steamboat-springs-high-school-hockey-players-receive-all-conference-all-state-honors/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 00:07:52 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334145 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Three members of the Steamboat Springs High School hockey team were recognized by the Colorado High School Activities Association on the conference and state levels. Patrick Sumner received all-state honorable mention honors. Sumner also was named first team all-conference while Tanner Ripley […]]]>
Steamboat Springs senior goaltender Patrick Sumner faces off against Wolverine forwards. Sailors senior Cameron Colombo assists with the save. (Photo by Leah Vann)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Three members of the Steamboat Springs High School hockey team were recognized by the Colorado High School Activities Association on the conference and state levels.

Patrick Sumner received all-state honorable mention honors.

Sumner also was named first team all-conference while Tanner Ripley and Matthew Kempers were named second team all-conference.

Sumner and Kempers also will be playing in the senior all-star game.

To reach Leah Vann, call 970-871-4253, email lvann@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @LVann_Sports

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/hockey-sbt-010419-325x242.jpg
Fly tying the focus of Yampa Valley Fly Fishers meeting March 13 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/fly-tying-the-focus-of-yampa-valley-fly-fishers-meeting-march-13/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 23:55:24 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334148 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Yampa Valley Fly Fishers will host its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13, at Rex’s American Grill in Steamboat Springs. The meeting will be a fly tying extravaganza, featuring some of the Yampa Valley’s finest fly tyers. Steve Henderson, of […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Yampa Valley Fly Fishers will host its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13, at Rex’s American Grill in Steamboat Springs. The meeting will be a fly tying extravaganza, featuring some of the Yampa Valley’s finest fly tyers.

Steve Henderson, of Henderson Fly Fishing, will be tying some of his most productive patterns for the Yampa River, developed over years of guiding in the Yampa Valley. Tim Drummond, of Yampa Valley Anglers, will demonstrate some of his signature patterns featured in Umpqua Feather Merchants Fly catalog. Ian Wilson, a fisheries technician with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, will focus on tying nymphs and emerges that work well on the Yampa River. Michael Gould, of 2Salt Travel and Yampa Valley Anglers, will be tying some of his salt water specialties. Scott Warner, of Yampa Valley Fly Fishers, will demonstrate his highly effective and top secret SW fly. Finally, Luca Sands, who has been tying since he was in middle school, will tie Kelly Gallups single wing crippled emerger mayfly as well as a few other of his personal favorites.

The meeting is free and open to the public. Pizza will be provided, and there will be a drawing for fly-fishing gear.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/012514_Flyfishing-325x228.jpg
Pay to play: Steamboat could increase user fees for golf, ballfields to reduce facility subsidies https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/pay-to-play-steamboat-could-increase-user-fees-for-golf-ballfields-to-reduce-facility-subsidies/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 23:28:39 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334136 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Some users could see changes in fees and operations as the city of Steamboat Springs considers how to recoup the cost of providing parks, ballfields and other recreation opportunities. Parks and recreation, in many situations, is a losing game for the city. […]]]>
Howelsen Hill Park contains ballfields, ski jumps, Alpine and Nordic skiing, the Howelsen Ice Arena and the rodeo grounds. The city is working to determine how it subsidizes different parks and recreation facilities and programs. (File photo)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Some users could see changes in fees and operations as the city of Steamboat Springs considers how to recoup the cost of providing parks, ballfields and other recreation opportunities.

Parks and recreation, in many situations, is a losing game for the city.

At Little Toots Park, for example, the city pays the cost of watering and mowing the grass and maintaining playground equipment, but visitors get to enjoy the swing set and grass beneath their feet without paying an admission fee.

In some instances, such as at Haymaker Golf Course, users pay fees that cover the cost of operating the facility. At the same time, the general public can't walk onto the green and start playing.

To develop a method to fairly determine where the city should be subsidizing the public's use of parks and recreation facilities and where the city should place a greater share of the financial burden on users, the Parks and Recreation Commission has been working through a strategy to decide how to recover costs.

The Parks and Recreation Commission hoped to match the rate at which facilities are subsidized to the rate at which they serve the community — Little Toots Park is almost completely subsidized by the city, while user fees are used to maintain and operate Haymaker.

"I think an important part of this exercise was not just trying to figure out where fees should go, but it was to really understand where we're spending our money, so we can make a policy decision on what it is we want to subsidize and at what level," Parks and Recreation Commissioner Doug Tumminello told council at its March 5 meeting.

With input from Steamboat Springs City Council and the Parks and Recreation Commission, parks facilities and programs were placed into five categories with recommended cost recovery goals:

  • Facilities that provide mostly a community benefit, including city parks, trails, open space and streetscaping, are expected to recoup up to 10 percent of the cost of maintaining and operating them.
  • Facilities that provide a considerable community benefit, including Howelsen Hill Ski Area and the rodeo grounds, are expected to recoup 10 to 25 percent of the cost.
  • Facilities that provide a balance of equal community and individual benefit, including youth programs and sports fields are expected to recoup 25 to 50 percent of the cost.
  • Facilities that provide a considerable individual benefit, including adult sports, the Tennis Center at Steamboat Springs, Howelsen Ice Arena and the Town Challenge Mountain Bike Series are expected to recoup 50 to 80 percent of the cost.
  • Haymaker Golf Course, which provides mostly individual benefit, is expected to recoup 80 to 100 percent of the cost.

Of these 13 program areas, four aren't currently meeting these cost recovery thresholds: Haymaker, the Town Challenge races, sports fields and the Tennis Center.

(Chart courtesy city of Steamboat Springs)

The Parks and Recreation Commission recommended some changes to operations and fees for these programs. Recreation and Enterprise Manager Kyrill Kretzschmar pointed out that cost reduction does not always require an increase in fees. Sponsorships, for example, could help the city recoup some programming costs. In all situations, the commission recommended staff seek to decrease the expense of operating these programs.

Under the commission recommendation, fees at Haymaker could see a 0.6 percent increase. Haymaker is currently recovering 79.5 percent of the cost of operating the facility, which is just under its goal.

The commission recommended a gradual increase in fees to participate in Town Challenge races and suggested partnering with another organization to host or co-host the event.

Cost recovery in sports fields differs between rectangular soccer and lacrosse fields and the diamonds that baseball and softball teams use. While rectangular fields are recovering 30.7 percent of the cost of upkeep, diamonds are recovering only 1.7 percent. This low cost recovery on diamond fields is what keeps the sports field category from its goal.

"It's important to note that our biggest (sports field) customer right now has a special use agreement, and that's Triple Crown," Kretzschmar said.

Triple Crown Sports does not currently pay field use fees under its current contract with the city, though that contract expires in late 2020. One of the terms of Triple Crown's use of Emerald Park this summer included paying field use fees on the fields. Staff hinted they would seek these field use fees as they negotiate a new contract with the company.

The Tennis Center is not meeting cost recovery goals because it is operated by a concessionaire. If the city's and the concessionaire's operational costs are combined, it is meeting its recommended cost recovery goal.

City Council instructed Parks and Recreation staff to bring forward a resolution adopting the new cost recovery strategy at a later date.

To view the city council’s discussion on this topic, visit docs.steamboatsprings.net:10100/OnBaseAgendaOnline/.

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/051614_Howelsen-325x216.jpg
Joyce Rankin: Have you ever considered teaching? https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/joyce-rankin-have-you-ever-considered-teaching/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 22:57:46 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334132 Are we really in need of more teachers? The answer seems to be somewhere between "yes and no." There are more full-time specialty teachers needed in specific areas like reading coaches, social/emotional learning, director of culture, behavior counselors, STEM, etc. However, there are so many […]]]>

Are we really in need of more teachers? The answer seems to be somewhere between "yes and no." There are more full-time specialty teachers needed in specific areas like reading coaches, social/emotional learning, director of culture, behavior counselors, STEM, etc.

However, there are so many teacher "titles" it might be worth your time to browse the list and see what type of teachers and credentials are available. Who knows? You might find an interesting part-time job.

Last month when Denver teachers went on strike, advertisements for substitute teachers reported paying $200 a day, double the amount normally paid to substitutes.

If we're in such need of teachers/substitute teachers across the state what might it take to entice retired or unemployed professionals to apply for part-time work as a substitute teacher? If you have any interest in this area, you can get all the information you need on the Colorado Department of Education website.

Curiosity got the better of me, so I accessed the CDE site and applied for a substitute teaching credential. Here's what I discovered.

If you already have a college degree, you can apply directly for a substitute teaching license. There are a variety of licenses and authorizations.

Applications range from teacher, substitute teacher, career and technical education authorization and initial authorization for adult education along with 53 additional titles. Each application has an automatic link to a checklist of requirements.

Every checklist requires you to include fingerprints from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Unusual as it may seem if you are in Denver and near the Capitol, this is the easiest part of the entire application. I "Googled" CBI and found an office two blocks from the Capitol.

There was a list of appointment times 20 minutes apart with many available throughout the day. I set up an appointment in the next 30 minutes, filled out the online form, printed it and walked over to the office. Within 10 minutes my fingerprints were electronically taken, no ink pad or mess, and sent off to CDE. Many local government entities in Colorado can also fingerprint.

You must have a valid government ID. A driver's license or passport is acceptable although there are other suitable options listed. Then obtain documentation of any issues related to licensure or employment in the past or criminal or disciplinary actions, if applicable.

Once you have completed these steps, you're ready to register into the "eLicensing" system. This is a one-time process, and all your requirements and scanned documents will be kept in your account for easy access. As soon as this initial registration is complete, you can finish your checklist and upload any scanned document requirements at your convenience.

When I first accessed my "eLicense" account, I could see where the CBI had already sent in my fingerprints. I was then able to upload a scanned copy of my driver's license, college transcripts (these took a few days to receive) and any other necessary documentation. The site even explains how to scan documents if you're not familiar with the process.

It doesn't cost anything to access the site and certification requirements, and you may be surprised to find out you can work at your convenience and help your local school district as a substitute teacher. By my calculations, the cost of obtaining the license will be paid by approximately two days of substitute teaching.

So, here's the catch. Your application can take up to six weeks to process. But wait, didn't I do everything electronically? I'll let you know when my certificate arrives, or if I was rejected for incorrectly filling out the forms.

Joyce Rankin is on the State Board of Education representing the 3rd Congressional District. She writes the monthly column, “Across the Street,” to share with constituents in the 29 counties she represents, including Routt County.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/SteamboatPilotSpring_logo-325x192.jpg
Rodger Steen: Reform of Colorado oil, gas permitting https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/rodger-steen-reform-of-colorado-oil-gas-permitting/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 22:35:07 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334117 On March 1, legislation was introduced in the Colorado General Assembly that would finally update the way our state makes decisions about permitting the oil and gas industry, which will take into account its impacts on its neighbors' health and welfare. These neighbors are the […]]]>

On March 1, legislation was introduced in the Colorado General Assembly that would finally update the way our state makes decisions about permitting the oil and gas industry, which will take into account its impacts on its neighbors' health and welfare. These neighbors are the citizens of Colorado.

This legislation is known as Senate Bill 19-181 and is overdue by more than a decade, to catch up with citizen protections required of other industries. This is a complex bill and is available for review at http://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb19-181. At its core is the rebalancing of state priorities to protect citizens' health, safety, welfare and the environment over saving money for the industry.

These new protections will apply statewide so they will affect our Western Slope and highly impacted places such as the retirement community of Battlement Mesa as well as the more densely populated Front Range.

Some other features of this bill include:

• Providing for local (city and county) land use control (requiring minimum setbacks, quality of access roads, etc.).

• Protecting property owners from forced pooling

• Requiring consideration of alternate well location when near populated areas

• Improving air emission controls and focusing on limiting toxins and methane (as a global warming gas) using currently-available control technology

• Strengthening wildlife protections

• Providing for adequate funding of local and state government for administration and oversight of the industry.

As with any industry that has for many years enjoyed special protections from impacted citizens, we anticipate well-funded pushback on this legislation, probably focusing on loss of jobs and revenue. These are the same 50-year-old industry arguments against tighter regulations that never come to pass.

We ask that each of you consider the arguments for and against this legislation, hopefully recognize the value in passage of this bill and that you will contact your state representatives indicating your support. For Routt County, Bob Rankin — bob.rankin.senate@state.co.us — is your senator and Dylan Roberts — Dylan.Roberts.House@State.CO.US — is your state legislator.

Rodger Steen

Chairman of Western Colorado Alliance’s Oil and Gas Committee

Steamboat Springs

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Parkinson’s Disease support group held monthly https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/parkinsons-disease-support-group-held-monthly/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 22:02:05 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334130 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A support group for people living with Parkinson's disease is held 5 to 6 p.m. the second Monday of every month at Hampton Inn & Suites, 725 South Lincoln Ave. The group is hosted by Yampa Valley Parkinson’s Support Network and Northwest […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A support group for people living with Parkinson's disease is held 5 to 6 p.m. the second Monday of every month at Hampton Inn & Suites, 725 South Lincoln Ave. The group is hosted by Yampa Valley Parkinson’s Support Network and Northwest Colorado Health. Discussions often include guest speakers and focus on quality of life issues, research updates and living well with Parkinson's disease. For more information, contact Adrienne Idsal at 970-367-3435 or ahearne@northwestcoloradohealth.org.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/NorthwestColoradoHealth_logo-325x192.jpg
Paul Bonnifield: Times of Israel article is enlightening https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/paul-bonnifield-times-of-israel-article-is-enlightening/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 20:25:09 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334113 I’m sure we have all heard something about Representative Amar’s statements concerning Israel, but as an interesting aside, today, I was killing time on the internet and typed in Times of Israel. It is Israel’s leading newspaper with an excellent reputation for fair and balanced […]]]>

I’m sure we have all heard something about Representative Amar’s statements concerning Israel, but as an interesting aside, today, I was killing time on the internet and typed in Times of Israel. It is Israel’s leading newspaper with an excellent reputation for fair and balanced news of the Middle East.

The headline — “There are no second-class citizens, Rivlin says, in implicit rebuke of Netanyahu” — by Raphael Ahren on March 11. I suggest all who are interested pull it up and read it. At least for me, it was an eye opener. I’ll not attempt to cover the entire article or explain it — just a few excerpts.

TV host, model and actress Rotem Sela, “What is the problem with the Arabs? … Dear god, there are also Arab citizens in this country. When the hell will someone in this government convey to the public that Israel is a state of all its citizens and that all the people were created equal, and that even the Arabs and the Druze and the LGBTs and — shock — the leftist are human.”

Netanyahu responded, “Israel is not a state of all its citizens but the nation-state of the Jewish people only.” At another time he stated, “Non-Jews have national representation in other states.”

Of course, Netanyahu is under indictment, and the national election is near, which add to the brew. I found the article worth reading. You may, also.

Paul Bonnifield

Yampa

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Steamboat man arrested on suspicion of killing his dog, throwing it off a bridge https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-man-arrested-on-suspicion-of-killing-his-dog-throwing-it-off-a-bridge/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 19:46:54 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334118 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A Steamboat Springs man was arrested Saturday after admitting to police he killed his own dog and threw it off a bridge in town. Christopher Dyer, 31, faces a charge of aggravated cruelty to animals, a felony, for needlessly killing an animal, […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — A Steamboat Springs man was arrested Saturday after admitting to police he killed his own dog and threw it off a bridge in town.

Christopher Dyer, 31, faces a charge of aggravated cruelty to animals, a felony, for needlessly killing an animal, according to an arrest affidavit obtained from the Routt County Justice Center.

The arrest comes as the Colorado House of Representatives passed a bill Tuesday that would provide mental health treatment to people who abuse animals, as well as restrict their ability to own a pet.

Steamboat Spring Police Department officers received a call late Friday from Dyer, who reported his own dog had bitten him. He went to the emergency room for two puncture wounds on his face, including one under his chin that required four stitches.

Officers met Dyer at the emergency room shortly after midnight Saturday and questioned him about the incident.

He told them, earlier in the night, he had been playing with his dog Apollo, a pit bull-mastiff mix. When the dog's playful nips turned to more aggressive biting, Dyer tried to hold Apollo down to calm him.

The dog lunged at Dyer, who tried again to restrain him, according to the affidavit. Dyer's hand slipped, and he lost his grip. Apollo lunged again and bit at his throat.

Initially, Dyer told officers he had thrown the dog in his kennel before heading to the emergency room, and Apollo was waiting in the kennel. Officers warned him that Apollo would likely attack Dyer, again, if the dog stayed at his house. He assured officers that he planned to put the dog down.

When officers asked Dyer for proof Apollo was up-to-date on his vaccinations, he said he had the paperwork back home. Officers gave Dyer a courtesy ride from the emergency room to his house and waited as he searched for the vaccination papers.

Recommended Stories For You

About five minutes later, he burst out of the front door.

"I'm just going to come clean," he told officers. "I killed him."

Dyer said he knew what he did was wrong and had been too embarrassed to admit it.

When officers asked Dyer what happened, he said, "I knocked him out at the bridge down by the river, over by Stockbridge," according to the affidavit.

According to the affidavit, Dyer was upset after Apollo bit him. He told officers he hit Apollo's head repeatedly on the bridge's metal railing until he believed the dog was unconscious. Then he threw his pet off the bridge into the river, where he assumed the dog died and floated away.

When officers asked Dyer why he didn't instead call the police, he said, "Honestly, I blacked out. I've never done anything so heinous before."

After killing his dog, he went back to his house and had a beer before taking a taxi to the emergency room, according to the affidavit.

Dyer posted a $2,000 cash bail and is scheduled to appear before the Routt County Court on April 2.

Legislation headed to Senate

Lawmakers, seeing a link between animal abuse and more violent criminal behavior, have proposed legislation to identify potentially dangerous individuals before they hurt people.

The Colorado House passed a new bill Tuesday that would provide more mental health treatment for those convicted of animal cruelty. It also would prevent people from having a pet animal for a period of time while they undergo treatment.

Rep. Alex Valdez, the sponsor of the bill, said its proposed benefits are two-fold: it removes animals from abusive situations and identifies behaviors that could lead to worse crimes.

"There is absolutely a correlation between crimes against animals and violent crimes, such as mass shootings or domestic terrorism," Valdez said in a news release.

She and other legislators cited a 2014 study of mass shootings, which found that 43 percent of school shooters had a history of animal abuse.

The bill passed with a bipartisan vote of 55-7 on Tuesday. It now heads to the Senate.

To reach Derek Maiolo, call 970-871-4247, email dmaiolo@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @derek_maiolo.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/MugTemplate_Dyer-325x192.jpg
JoAnn Baker Paul: Steamboat’s living environment is priceless https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/joann-baker-paul-steamboats-living-environment-is-priceless/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 17:21:45 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334112 Beloved Steamboat — have you forgotten who you really are? Have you forgotten your primal soul — the origin of this magical natural place that drew so many of us here to begin with? A wildlife and wilderness habitat sanctuary before all else? Do you, […]]]>

Beloved Steamboat — have you forgotten who you really are? Have you forgotten your primal soul — the origin of this magical natural place that drew so many of us here to begin with? A wildlife and wilderness habitat sanctuary before all else?

Do you, as a community albeit full of many new residents, have the capacity to awaken to the wisdom of our ancestry? To remembering that every animal, plant, creek, insect, bird, mountain, rock, tree and river is a unique soul gift and teaching, relevant to the whole — and our survival as a species in this particular place? That nothing — even mosquitoes — is separate from the whole nor can be taken for granted?

Can we surrender our false human hierarchy and limit our superficial insatiable desires to instead mindfully preserve the vital source of our local habitat economic growth must protect our priceless living environment — the reason we are here.

We are currently walking the razor’s edge with the proposed aggressive sports expansion — the antithesis of silence and stillness — in our National Forest. When will enough be too much? I believe we are there now.

Why? We are not adequately caring for that which we already have in place. Numerous physical and managerial issues are present within many existing trail systems; the physical effects expand far beyond the trails themselves.

Emerald Mountain is a prime example. Ask the Stanko ranchers and their neighbors. In Routt National Forest, we have an established primary hiking and biking antithesis, biker-created trails at Mad Creek, serious parking issues in the lower Bear/Hot Springs area, all indicating a clear present priority — the need for regulation and enforcement before any new expansion of trails.

Renovating and possible expansion of human services and restoring existing campgrounds on Rabbit Ears Pass should be addressed at this stage also. The Forest Service and Colorado Parks and Wildlife need our support immediately to adequately manage and protect what we already have in place — again before any new trails are built.

Once these responsibilities are met and results are measured, new data will inform us. Any expansion must be slow and always mindful of what fundamentally takes precedence: wildlife, wilderness first.

JoAnn Baker Paul

Steamboat Springs

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Too drunk to ski: The Record for Monday, March 11, 2019 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/too-drunk-to-ski-the-record-for-monday-march-11-2019/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 16:58:08 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334108 Monday, March 11, 2019 12:32 a.m. Routt County Sheriff's Office deputies were called about shots fired in the 1300 block of Colorado Highway 131 in McCoy. 12:54 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers were called about loud music and a large party at a residence at 10th […]]]>

Monday, March 11, 2019

12:32 a.m. Routt County Sheriff's Office deputies were called about shots fired in the 1300 block of Colorado Highway 131 in McCoy.

12:54 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers were called about loud music and a large party at a residence at 10th Street and Lincoln Avenue. Officers told the partiers to quiet down.

9:05 a.m. Officers were called about the theft of a Louis Vuitton belt worth $550. The belt was reportedly stolen from the changing room of a business in the 2500 block of Village Drive.

Crime Stoppers

If you have information about any unsolved crime, contact Routt County Crime Stoppers. You will remain anonymous and could earn a cash reward.

Submit a tip
• Call: 970-870-6226
• Click: TipSubmit.com
• Text: Send “NAMB” and your message to 274637

9:48 a.m. Steamboat Resort security officers would not allow a man on the gondola because he was too intoxicated. They barred him from the resort for the rest of the day. Officers gave the man a courtesy ride back to his apartment, but he soon returned to the resort to complain about getting kicked out. Officers arrested the man for trespassing.

11:33 a.m. Officers were called about the reported theft of a ski valet cart worth $900 from a business in the 1800 block of Ski Time Square Drive.

5:44 p.m. The landlord of a residence in the 2700 block of Downhill Drive called officers for help evicting a man who had been staying illegally at the residence for the past two weeks.

6:14 p.m. Officers were called about the reported theft of ski goggles worth $300 from a business at Steamboat Resort.

7:48 p.m. Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue firefighters assisted a person who fell at a senior living center in the 2800 block of Owl Hoot Trail.

8:28 p.m. Officers were called about a complaint of homeless people who reportedly have been living in a tent by a grocery store in the 1400 block of South Lincoln Avenue.

9:43 p.m. Officers were called about a transient man who has been sleeping in the laundry room of a business in the 300 block of Anglers Drive for several days.

10:24 p.m. An intoxicated man passed out on a Steamboat Springs Transit bus and people were unable to wake him. He regained consciousness after officers arrived.

Total incidents: 37

  • Steamboat officers had 18 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Sheriff’s deputies had 10 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Steamboat firefighters responded to seven calls for service.
  • West Routt Fire Protection District firefighters responded to two calls for service.

The Record offers a glimpse of police activity and is not a comprehensive report of all police activity. Calls such as domestic violence, sexual assaults and juvenile situations typically do not appear in The Record.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/The-Record_logo-325x192.jpg
Steamboat man survives heart attack because of life-saving efforts of Roaring Fork athletic trainer https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-man-survives-heart-attack-because-of-life-saving-efforts-of-roaring-fork-athletic-trainer/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 16:28:55 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334109 GLENWOOD SPRINGS — A Steamboat Springs man attending his son's middle school basketball tournament Saturday at Roaring Fork High School in Carbondale is lucky Ryan Erickson was on duty as the tournament's athletic trainer. The Steamboat man had a heart attack inside the auxiliary gym […]]]>
A quick-thinking athletic trainer and an automated external defibrillator helped save a Steamboat man’s life at a middle school basketball tournament Saturday in Carbondale. (Stock photo)

GLENWOOD SPRINGS — A Steamboat Springs man attending his son's middle school basketball tournament Saturday at Roaring Fork High School in Carbondale is lucky Ryan Erickson was on duty as the tournament's athletic trainer.

The Steamboat man had a heart attack inside the auxiliary gym at the high school when Erickson used CPR and the school's automated external defibrillator to resuscitate him.

Erickson, who was in his office at the high school, was summoned by the tournament director to assist the man, who had passed out in the stands.

"When I reached him, he was unconscious and was experiencing agonal breathing, which is gasping for breath," Erickson said. "That type of breathing happens to people going through cardiac arrest."

Upon reaching the man and seeing him struggling to breathe, Erickson said he couldn't find much of a pulse, prompting him to start CPR. While Erickson performed CPR on the man, a bystander called 911, and the tournament site manager, Bill Young, raced to get the defibrillator.

Following the first cycle of chest compressions, Erickson and a couple of attendants at the tournament moved the man from the bleachers to the floor, where Erickson prepped the man for the AED.

Thanks to consistent training and certifications, Erickson said he knew exactly what to do.

"You always kind of wonder if this is ever going to happen to you when you're on the job and always wonder how you're going to react in that situation," Erickson said. "You just get into autopilot, and your training takes over."

Young, who raced to Erickson's side with the AED, said it was remarkable to watch Erickson save the man's life.

"He knew exactly what he was doing," an emotional Young said. "He was familiar with the AED and had training on it. He went through the exact, perfect motions. He stepped right in and knew exactly what he was doing. It was just remarkable to watch."

After the first set of shocks to the man's chest, Erickson said, the man started to breath normally. At that time, Carbondale police and an ambulance had arrived at the school, taking over for Erickson.

The man was conscious while leaving the gym with paramedics before heading to the hospital. Later in the day, fellow Steamboat parents confirmed that the man had had a heart attack.

"I was just doing my job," Erickson said.

This story is from PostIndependent.com.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/shutterstock_1283229223-325x183.jpg
Get involved: Routt County volunteer opportunities https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/get-involved-routt-county-volunteer-opportunities-20/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 15:59:09 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334107 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Pilot & Today has partnered with Routt County United Way to offer a listing of volunteer opportunities across Routt County. For a complete list of volunteer opportunities and more information, visit routtcountyunitedway.org. Featured volunteer opportunity The Luck of the Irish 7K […]]]>
The Luck of the Irish 7K is in need of volunteers for the race Saturday, March 16. Pictured is Lacy Morrill, who ran with her dogs Rico and Gerti at last year's event. (Courtesy photo)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — The Steamboat Pilot & Today has partnered with Routt County United Way to offer a listing of volunteer opportunities across Routt County. For a complete list of volunteer opportunities and more information, visit routtcountyunitedway.org.

Featured volunteer opportunity

The Luck of the Irish 7K is in need of volunteers to help direct runners on the course and to help with timing. Shifts are one to 1 1/2 hours from 8:45 to 10:15 a.m. Saturday, March 16. Proceeds raised at the event will benefit Steamboat Springs Middle School running programs. Contact 970-846-2722 or kevinmfonger@gmail.com.

Time-sensitive volunteer opportunities

• Partners in Routt County is in need of caring adults to be matched as a mentor to one of 25 youths on the waiting list. Volunteers are asked to spend a few hours each week with a child ages 7 to 17 doing activities, helping with schoolwork and being a friend. Email julia@partnersrouttcounty.org.

• Mountain Village Montessori is in need of volunteers to teach or help with Wednesday Workshops. The weekly program is designed to enrich the lives of students in a creative and hands-on way. Workshop leaders are needed from 2 to 3 p.m. Wednesdays from March 20 to May 22. Those with a trade, skill, hobby or interest to share with students ages 6 to 12 are encouraged to sign up. Contact elizabeth@mvmcs.org or 970-879-6653.

• Routt County Humane Society is in need of dog walkers and kennel cleaners in the mornings and on weekends. Apply at routthumane.org or call 970-879-7247.

• UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center is in need of volunteers in the free lending library to help physicians, staff and community members research medical topics and check out books. Contact peggy.bowers@uchealth.org or 970-870-1146.

• Horizons Specialized Services participants are looking for opportunities to spend time in the community. Whether it be grabbing a cup of coffee, running an errand or cheering on the home team, the weekly one-hour outings will be structured around volunteer availability and shared interests. Call 970-879-4466.

Ongoing volunteer opportunities

• Advocates of Routt County is in need of agency volunteers to support office staff by helping with organizing, filing and computer work. Contact marnie@avdocatesrc.org or 970-879-2034.

• LiftUp of Routt County is in need of volunteers in the food bank. Fill out an application at liftuprc.org, or contact 970-870-0727 or volunteer@liftuprc.org.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/run-sbt-031119-325x216.jpg
‘The Death of Religion’ discussion to be hosted at Library Hall https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/the-death-of-religion-discussion-to-be-hosted-at-library-hall/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 15:30:29 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334083 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Religious leaders in Steamboat Springs will gather at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at Bud Werner Memorial Library's Library Hall, 1289 Lincoln Ave., to discuss "The Death of Religion." The discussion, presented by Exploring the Sacred, will focus on the relevance and […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Religious leaders in Steamboat Springs will gather at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at Bud Werner Memorial Library's Library Hall, 1289 Lincoln Ave., to discuss "The Death of Religion."

The discussion, presented by Exploring the Sacred, will focus on the relevance and future of religion in today's modern society. Presenters from all faiths will be present, including Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism and agnostic. The event is free and open to the public.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Library_outsideview-325x216.jpg
Routt County in photos: March 11, 2019 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/routt-county-in-photos-march-11-2019/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 03:21:52 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334098 Check out our latest photos from readers in and across Routt County, and submit your own to share@SteamboatPilot.com. See more photos at SteamboatPilot.com/photos/galleries.]]>

Check out our latest photos from readers in and across Routt County, and submit your own to share@SteamboatPilot.com. See more photos at SteamboatPilot.com/photos/galleries.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Bud-Whitehead-293x325.jpeg
Steamboat DACA recipients travel to DC to advocate for permanent protections https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-daca-recipients-travel-to-washington-d-c-advocate-for-permanent-protections/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 01:21:18 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334086 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Armando Reyes, 21, is a promising student at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs who plans to get his degree in the spring, wants to be a part of our country’s military and dreams of someday being a chef in his own […]]]>
Axel Garcia, left, and Armando Reyes are Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients who are hoping to make the most of their opportunities in America. Garcia graduated from Soroco High School and is a freshman at Colorado Mountain College Steamboat Springs, and Reyes will graduate from CMC in the spring. Both recently traveled to Washington, D.C., to advocate for permanent protections for DACA recipients. (Photo by John F. Russell)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Armando Reyes, 21, is a promising student at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs who plans to get his degree in the spring, wants to be a part of our country’s military and dreams of someday being a chef in his own restaurant.

"I'm hoping to own one somewhere in the future," Reyes said about his plans to run a restaurant. "But that's a few years down the road."

But last week, Reyes wasn't serving up food as much as political action. The CMC resident assistant was one of six Colorado residents who traveled to Washington, D.C., to advocate for permanent protections for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals while meeting with Colorado legislators.

Reyes, who grew up in Olathe, is one of an estimated 700,000 young, unauthorized immigrants, often called “Dreamers,” who have received work permits and protection from deportation through the DACA program.

He has lived in Colorado since he was 4 and, like so many of the children and young adults like him, dreams of someday becoming a citizen in the country where he grew up.

"As cliché as it sounds, it means everything," Reyes said about DACA. "It really does mean everything for me and other DACA recipients."

Reyes said DACA allowed him to step out of the shadows, go to high school without fear and get a driver’s license. It also allowed him to work, go to college where he hopes to earn a degree in restaurant and culinary management and — maybe someday — own his own restaurant. None of that would have been possible, he said, without support from his family, the community where he grew up and DACA.

"I still remember how ecstatic I was when I learned that I could get my permit, my license. I remember how I didn't have to be afraid if I just drove down the block or somewhere else,” Reyes said. “It was a confidence boost because, at the time, I would only think about the things that I couldn't do. But when I got it, I said, 'I'm just like everybody else.’ It opened up so many doors for me."

Last week, Reyes was joined by fellow CMC student Axel Garcia as part of a group of nearly 80 individuals from 12 states who took part in the #ProtectTheDream fly-in, supported by FWD.us, National TPS Alliance and UndocuBlack Network.

"I am hoping that they will make it (DACA) a permanent thing," said Garcia, who grew up in Yampa and graduated from Soroco High School last year. "I hope everybody gets a chance to stay and live the American dream. I hope we get a chance to work in the area that we want and, if we work hard enough, get to the position that we want. I hope we do not have to live in fear that one day our time will run out, and we will get deported."

Reyes and Garcia recently renewed their DACA status, and now they are hoping the U.S. Congress will address what to do with DACA recipients in the next two years. If Reyes and Garcia, who were brought to this country as children, can't renew their DACA status, they face the possibility of being deported to an unfamiliar country.

"One of the most important things about the fly-in is having the opportunity for people who are directly impacted by the issue to be able to make a call to action through their representatives around the urgency that exists to find permanent protections, so that they are not continuing to live their lives on a court-by-court basis or a two-year by two-year increment," said Marissa Molina, Colorado State Immigration Manager for FWD.us. "Having those meetings with representatives is an opportunity for them to hear directly just how peoples’ lives have been in limbo since the administration started making those active threats on the programs and make a call to action around the urgency around them, their families and their communities."

The Trump administration put the fate of people like Reyes and Garcia in the hands of Congress in 2017. Last week, the DACA recipients — along with others in the temporary protected status and deferred enforcement departure categories — met with Democrats like Reps. Joe Neguse and Diana DeGette as well as Sens. Michael Bennet, D-CO, and Cory Gardner, R-CO. They also met with staff members from the offices of Republican Reps. Ken Buck and Scott Tipton.

"My message was mainly my story, and those of people who grew up the way I did," Reyes said. "I was basically telling them my memories are filled with what I couldn't do instead of all the good memories most people my age would have."

To reach John F. Russell, call 970-871-4209, email jrussell@SteamboatPilot.com or follow him on Twitter @Framp1966.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/DACA_sbt-031219-1x-325x226.jpg
Obituary: Alice Louise Veasman https://www.steamboatpilot.com/milestones/obituaries/obituary-alice-louise-veasman/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 00:44:34 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334094 July 24, 1921 — February 23, 2019 Alice Veasman died peacefully on February 23, 2019 at age 97 in her apartment at Casey's Pond Senior Living in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where she lived happily since late 2014. She was born on July 24, 1921 in […]]]>

July 24, 1921 — February 23, 2019

Alice Veasman died peacefully on February 23, 2019 at age 97 in her apartment at Casey's Pond Senior Living in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where she lived happily since late 2014.

She was born on July 24, 1921 in Chicago to Fred and Rita Pellegrini. Her younger siblings were Richard (deceased) and Fredine.

She began her passion for dancing at an early age. After graduation from Amundsen High School and secretarial school, she worked for Gooder-Henrichsen, an engineering firm that shored up buildings in Chicago when the subway was built. During this time, she continued dancing with Emily Hoffman's School of Dance where she performed at theaters, hotels and conventions. She was very acrobatic and did ballet, tap, Spanish, and contemporary dance, having been selected by Martha Graham to perform this new genre in Chicago. She was a natural ballroom dancer her whole life. She and Dad danced at parties and celebrations. He happily let others dance with her, too. She could follow anyone.

She met Frank Veasman, her husband for 53 years, at Gooder-Henrichsen. He was engaged to another and she had a boyfriend. He was an engineering graduate of the University of Illinois. When WWII was threatening and he wanted to do defense work, he asked Alice to type his applications after work. She somewhat goaded him into taking her out to dinner for her efforts and their feelings for each other began to bloom. They had two more dates before he left for Newport News, VA to work as an engineer for a Navy contractor and they wrote letters constantly. While Alice was on a Pellegrini family vacation in Newport News, Frank asked her to marry him.

They were married on Oct 25, 1941 in St. Benedict's Church in Chicago. It was a big Italian wedding. After the war began Frank joined the Navy as an Ensign and was sent to Cal Tech for several months.

Gail was born in Chicago in 1943, as Alice was with her parents while Frank was at Cal Tech. After Frank was assigned to the Naval Office of Research and Invention in Washington, D.C., they moved to D.C. and remained there until the end of WWII.

They moved back to the Chicago area and bought their first home in Oak Forest, Illinois just before Ken was born in 1948. She was active in the PTA and all of her children's activities. Both Gail and Ken graduated from the University of Illinois.

Gail married Brooks Kellogg in 1966, and Ken married Michelle Sassaman in 1996.

In 1975, Frank and Alice moved to Sopchoppy, Florida, where they helped build the St. Elizabeth of Seton church. She continued being active in her new community with the Garden Club, Homemakers Club, Rotary and the church. She was a wonderful cook and enjoyed hosting many family and friends gatherings here and in Illinois.

There will be a vigil service in Casey's Pond on March 16, 2019 at 1:00 PM.

The funeral service will be at St Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Crawfordville, Florida on March 30, 2019 at 11:00AM. She will be buried next to Frank in the church's cemetery.

All who knew her experienced her big smile, and her joyful, grateful and loving self.

Hers is a life to celebrate. We picture her with God and dancing with Dad again.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/031319_Veasman_Obitwphoto.jpeg
Obituary: David A. Dworakowski https://www.steamboatpilot.com/milestones/obituaries/obituary-david-a-dworakowski/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 00:43:28 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334093 December 12, 1949 — March 9, 2019

David A. Dworakowski, 69, of Steamboat Springs passed away March 9, 2019 at home. A Visitation will be held 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Monday, March 18, 2019 at Holy Name Catholic Church followed by a Funeral Mass at 12:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to the American Heart Association in care of Yampa Valley Funeral Home PO Box 776090 Steamboat Springs, CO 80477.

]]>
Obituary: Richard Burch Davis https://www.steamboatpilot.com/milestones/obituaries/obituary-richard-burch-davis/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 00:42:42 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334092 November 8, 1938 — March 6, 2019

“Rich” 80, died peacefully on March 6, 2019. He was a resident of Steamboat Springs from 1979 to 1994. He was born November 8, 1938 in Sterling, Colorado to Burch and Estella Davis. Rich attended high school in Colby, Kansas. Shortly after high school Rich joined the U.S. Navy where he served honorably for 3 years. While in the Navy he had the name of his lifelong sweetheart, “Marla Jo” tattooed on his shoulder. Marla Jo would become his wife of 59 years. Rich worked at Safeway as a meat cutter for 34 years before retiring at the age of 55 to travel. After retiring, Rich and Marla Jo traveled extensively before embracing the RV lifestyle working as campground hosts. Rich loved being outdoors camping, fly fishing and river rafting. Rich also was known for knitting over 30 beautiful Afghans for family and friends. Rich is survived by his wife of 59 years, Marla Jo Davis, brother Dennis Davis, several cousins, two sons Dr. Gary Burch Davis and Jim Richard Davis, daughter Denice Deann Gray, and seven grandchildren Sabrina, Katie, Adam, Alison, James, Abby, and Drew. Services will be held March 14, 2019 10:30am in CastleRock, Colorado. To send your condolences, please visit https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/castle-rock-co/richard-davis-8197019

]]>
Steamboat City Council to discuss how to spend $1.2M in excess 2A trails tax funds https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat-city-council-to-talk-2a-trails-tax-dogs-at-tuesday-work-session/ Tue, 12 Mar 2019 00:30:07 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334088 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Tuesday, Steamboat Springs City Council will discuss how to move forward with accommodations tax funds that are not currently designated for specific projects. "This is a work session that is for council to get an update on the accommodation tax fund […]]]>
A mountain biker takes in the view of Steamboat Resort from a trail on Emerald Mountain in 2015. Funds from 2A helped construct miles of new trails on Emerald Mountain. (File photo by Scott Franz)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Tuesday, Steamboat Springs City Council will discuss how to move forward with accommodations tax funds that are not currently designated for specific projects.

"This is a work session that is for council to get an update on the accommodation tax fund and work through the process of how they want to move forward," City Finance Director Kim Weber said.

Steamboat's accommodations tax is frequently referred to as the 2A tax, named for the 2013 referendum that designated revenue from the tax to fund trail development, improvements to Yampa Street and marketing these tourist-related improvements.

If you go

What: Steamboat Springs City Council work session
When: 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 12
Where: Citizens' Meeting Room in Centennial Hall, 124 10th St.

City Council also will discuss community housing code and dog-related issues in the city, including off-leash areas, enforcement and fenced dog parks.

Those who cannot attend the meeting can contact City Council or watch a live video stream of the meeting by visiting the city’s website: steamboatsprings.net.

At that time, $660,000 was designated toward these items annually, but the city has collected more than $660,000 in revenue over the years. This work session will focus on how to deal with the extra funds.

Accommodations tax history

City voters first passed the accommodations tax in 1986. The original ballot language designated revenue from the tax for "improvements and amenities in Steamboat Springs, which will promote tourism and enhance the vitality of Steamboat Springs."

Initially, the tax paid for the former Strings Music Tent, the Tennis Center at Steamboat Springs and improvements to Haymaker Golf Course.

In 2013, accommodations tax revenue paid off the final bond on the projects at Haymaker, and a committee was formed to advise City Council on how to spend the money going forward.

Several proposals were considered: more pickleball courts, purchasing land for open space, building more restrooms in city parks, a sports complex at Howelsen Hill and improvements to the Emerald, Bear River and Yampa River Botanic parks.

In 2013, two projects were placed on the ballot and approved by voters with a 10-year sunset. The first was a revitalization of Yampa Street, installing pocket parks and wider sidewalks, among other improvements. The second was the Steamboat Springs Trails Alliance proposal, which suggested expanding trails in the areas of Emerald Mountain, Buffalo Pass, Mad Creek, Rabbit Ears Pass and within city limits.

At a glance

2013 Referendum 2A ballot language:
Shall the city of Steamboat Springs be obligated to a multiple-fiscal year obligation by allocating, for the next 10 fiscal years, the revenues from the existing public accommodations tax (tax revenues), on a fiscal year basis, as follows: A) The first $600,000 of tax revenues to be split on a 50 percent-50 percent basis between 1. the development of trails in and around the city in accordance with the Trails Alliance proposal and 2) improvements to Yampa Street in accordance with the Yampa Street River Park proposal, until the total allocation to the improvements on Yampa Street reaches $900,000, thereafter 100 percent of the first $600,000 of tax revenues shall be spent on development of trails; B) the next $60,000 of tax revenues to be split on a 50 percent-50 percent basis between 1. marketing of the tourist-related improvements constructed with tax revenues and 2. reserves for the Haymaker Golf Course capital improvements; and C) any tax revenues in excess of $660,000 may be spent at the discretion of city council on projects authorized by the 1986 public accommodations tax ballot question?

Read more:
Voters to have say in how lodging tax is spent with Referendum 2A
Steamboat Springs voters overwhelmingly support spending lodging tax on trails, Yampa promenade

The ballot language allocated $660,000 in revenue a year. Of that, $300,000 went to Yampa Street and $300,000 went to trails. The remaining $60,000 went to marketing those trails and Haymaker.

In 2017, according to the plan laid out in the ballot language, the funds designated for Yampa Street were folded into the funds designated for trails, meaning $600,000 annually is intended for trails listed in the Trails Alliance proposal from 2017 to 2023.

"The reason the original ballot language only allocated $660,000 is because that was the lowest it got during the recession, so now we’re bringing in $1.1 million a year, but that can go down by 20 percent in one year during a recession," Weber said.

That leaves some accommodations tax money available for other projects that were not set forward in the 2013 ballot language.

So far, this extra cash was allocated to the Old Town Hot Springs expansion project ($286,000) and paid for design work on the project to build a second sheet of ice adjacent to Howelsen Ice Arena ($355,228). Today, there is $1,193,688 available for other projects, which must be used for tourist amenities.

This is what City Council will discuss Tuesday when it will consider how and whether to appropriate these "excess" funds.

Deciding how to move forward

On Tuesday, Weber will ask council members if they want to allocate this money or keep it restricted. If council members do want to allocate the money, they will have to decide how this will be done — through a committee, making the decision themselves or some other way. The council also will consider whether it would like to have an election to repurpose accommodations tax funds.

Some opponents of the Mad Rabbit Project, which is receiving funds from the accommodations tax, have called for the city to retract accommodations tax funds from the project. Weber said the bulk of public comments she's received related to the tax are about Mad Rabbit.

"This work session really isn't about that," she said.

City Council can take public comment at the council’s discretion in work sessions. If council holds public comment, members of the Routt Recreation Roundtable have been advised that one representative of each stakeholder group will have three minutes to speak.

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/092215_Endowment-325x198.jpg
CSU Extension to host pressure canning course Saturday https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/csu-extension-to-host-pressure-canning-course-saturday/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 23:30:43 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334082 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Colorado State University Extension in Steamboat Springs will host a pressure canning class at the Routt County Fairground's Exhibit Hall, 365 S. Poplar St., in Hayden. The program will include instruction from the Yampa Valley's most accomplished food preservers, the basics of […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Colorado State University Extension in Steamboat Springs will host a pressure canning class at the Routt County Fairground's Exhibit Hall, 365 S. Poplar St., in Hayden. The program will include instruction from the Yampa Valley's most accomplished food preservers, the basics of pressure canning and tips for preserving in high altitude. Participants who bring their pressure canners along will have a chance for them to be evaluated for safety and accuracy. To register or for more information, contact the CSU Extension office at 970-879-0825.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Fair-1-325x222.jpg
Yampa native performs in Whitman College One Act Play Festival https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/yampa-native-performs-in-whitman-college-one-act-play-festival/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 22:31:31 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334081 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Yampa native Garrett Redmond took part in Whitman College's annual One Act Play Festival from Feb. 7 to 10 at Harper Joy's Theater in Walla Walla, Washington. Students from across campus produced original scripts, and three were chosen by a jury of […]]]>

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Yampa native Garrett Redmond took part in Whitman College's annual One Act Play Festival from Feb. 7 to 10 at Harper Joy's Theater in Walla Walla, Washington. Students from across campus produced original scripts, and three were chosen by a jury of students and faculty of the college to be performed. All plays were produced, acted and designed by students.

Whitman College is a private liberal arts college founded in 1882. It is home to 1,500 undergraduate students studying 45 departmental majors for a Bachelor of Arts degree.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/EducationBriefs_logo-325x192.jpg
Eugene Buchanan: Fishing without freezing on Stagecoach Reservoir https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/eugene-buchanan-fishing-without-freezing-on-stagecoach-reservoir/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 22:25:24 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=333703 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — What happens in the fish house, stays in the fish house. So says Brady Wettlaufer, owner of Steamboat Fishing Adventures. So far, I'm getting skunked while jigging my lure up and down through a hole on Stagecoach Reservoir. But at least I'm […]]]>
Groups try to lure fish above the ice on Stagecoach Reservoir. (Photo by Scott Franz)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — What happens in the fish house, stays in the fish house. So says Brady Wettlaufer, owner of Steamboat Fishing Adventures.

So far, I'm getting skunked while jigging my lure up and down through a hole on Stagecoach Reservoir. But at least I'm not sitting on a frigid five-gallon bucket, freezing my fanny off. Minnesota transplant Wettlaufer has made it luxurious through the use of three heated Aluma-Lite Fishhouses, the only ones of their kind in the state.

After snowmobiling us across the reservoir to a place they call Pikey Bay, I sit on a cushioned chair, listening to tunes as I jig. Adorning the walls is artwork of an Eskimo girl ice fishing, a 52-inch TV and a mural of the planets. Oddly resembling the planets, five 8-inch holes pierce the floor, leading to the void below.

We're after pike, but not doing a very good job. The way to catch the big ones, he said, is to lure them up with a decoy and then spear them. The state record was pulled out of Stagecoach in the winter, and the other day, a 35-pounder swam under the hut, he said. He knows that from the TV displaying live video from the underwater AcquaVU camera, aided by 100,000 LED lumens. Other electronic amenities he uses include a Vexilar sonar system and Hummingbird fish finder. Keeping us toasty inside is a 15,000 BTU heater.

"Technology has completely reshaped the sport,” Wettlaufer said. “You can ice fish now while having the comfort of your living room."

A living room, that is, with six holes in the floor: one for the camera, one for the lights, and four for fishing, including the rattle reel, or "Minnesota alarm clock," which rattles to life whenever a fish strikes.

But right now, there's no such clatter. The pesky pike aren't cooperating. The TV shows nothing but an ominous void and the lake bottom, which looks like the moon. So we pack up and snowmobile elsewhere. Now, we're going for rainbows, 12 feet down.

Let’s try over here: The fish shack being pulled by the Argo ATV. (Photo by Eugene Buchanan)

We drop our lures to the bottom, bring them up one reel and then jig them up and down, the motion much like flipping an egg. Then we watch the sonar and TV camera to see who's coming for dinner.

"You can actually see fish lurking in the shadows and watching you," Wettlaufer said.

With that, I sit. And jig. And jig. And jig. That's what it's all about. You shoot the breeze with your shackmates, cue up music playlists and jig. Sometimes, you find yourself jigging your rod tip to the beat of the music, say a bluegrass or reggae beat.

"You want it to flip down there in a little circle," Wettlaufer said, showing us his lure's perfect acrobatic move on the camera. I stare at the sonar circle as if it's a video game. Your lure's jig motion is illuminated by green. A red light means a fish is approaching, not to be confused with an air bubble.

"Believe me, you'll know when it's a fish," Wettlaufer said.

I also watch the TV screen, which is more fun. Usually, it displays just dark, eerie nothingness. It's like waiting for the creature from the “Black Lagoon” to appear. I half expect “Jaws” music to begin. Then we see a few shrimp fluttering around, an indicator of a good fishery, Wettlaufer said. Soon after, a giant, one-clawed crawfish ambers across the sandy lake bottom. It looks like Sebastian in the "Little Mermaid."

But no fish.

Tim Bohlin, left, and Eugene Buchanan inside the fish shack, waiting for the hook to set. (Photo courtesy Eugene Buchanan)

My neck gets sore from looking sideways and up at the TV screen — an embarrassing case of ice-fisher's neck. My wrist starts to ache from the jigging.

And then the fish come into the camera zone, swimming by one, two, three at a time. None take the lure, but one opens its mouth Godzilla-style right into the camera.

I feel like Jacques Cousteau searching for a sunken ship in his SP-350 submarine launched off the Calypso.

Recommended Stories For You

Clients have asked if the screen is just a loop, Wettlaufer said, showing the same thing over and over again. But it's not. It's real time, showing something you always suspected: fish ignoring your lure. And so, you jig. And jig.

On average, Wettlaufer said, his groups catch about 10 fish per night, but he's also been skunked and "into the 30s." His ongoing narration is just part of the package.

"Ooh, come on, baby. Here you go. That one was camera shy. Ooh, there's one."

When darkness takes hold, Wettlaufer lowers a green light to attract baitfish, which attract bigger fish.

As with any ice fisher who's been at it a few hours, my mind naturally starts to wander. I think about how thick and safe the ice really is. It's 7 inches, Wettlaufer said, enough to support a passenger car. And his shacks actually float, which is comforting.

But it's not without its hazards. Wettlaufer has lost six iPhones to the drink so far, all through the holes.

"Sometimes, I forget not to keep it in my lap," he said. One time, he could see his phone flutter down to the bottom on the camera, lighting up with an incoming text on the way down. He's also improvised various ways to retrieve them.

Jiggity jig: Eugene Buchanan angling through the ice. (Photo courtesy Eugene Buchanan)

Then the fish start biting.

Tim Bohlin, staring at the sonar, strikes first, pulling up a 14-incher. Then he pulls up another and another. I see fish swim right by my lure, but they either don’t take it, or I muff the set. Finally, I get one and then another, right when Bob Marley's “Redemption Song” blasts out of the speaker.

Before we know it, it's 10 p.m., way longer than we thought we'd be out. That happens all the time out here, he said. Clients don’t want to leave. And why would they? You're heckling friends, cranking tunes and fishing in the warmth of a shack in the middle of the night on a frozen lake.

And whatever happens there, stays there.

To reach Eugene Buchanan, call 970-871-4276 or email ebuchanan@SteamboatPilot.com.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/011017_Icefishingwild-325x228.jpg
Yampa Valley sees deepest snowpack in 5 years https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/yampa-valley-sees-deepest-snowpack-in-5-years/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 21:40:30 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334072 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — As local skiers’ quads ache from another powder weekend and neighborhood teens’ arms tire from another round of snow shoveling, the Yampa Valley has seen its deepest snowpack since winter 2013-14. Most backyards in Steamboat Springs are filled with thigh-deep snow. In the […]]]>
The Yampa River runs through downtown Steamboat Springs on Friday morning. (Photo by John F. Russell)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — As local skiers’ quads ache from another powder weekend and neighborhood teens’ arms tire from another round of snow shoveling, the Yampa Valley has seen its deepest snowpack since winter 2013-14.

Most backyards in Steamboat Springs are filled with thigh-deep snow. In the mountains, the Natural Resource Conservation Service’s snow telemetry sites above Steamboat are all at or above average, from 47 inches of snow at the Bear River site in South Routt to 148 inches at the Tower site on Buffalo Pass.

On Saturday, the Yampa and White River Basin's snowpack hit 23.8 inches of snow water equivalent, a measure that considers the amount of water contained in the snowpack. Considering snowpack data from 1986 to present, the median peak of snowpack in the Yampa and White River Basin is 22.9 inches of snow water equivalent. This typically occurs around April 13 when snowpack peaks before melting off.

This year's snowfall has exceeded that median, and it did so about a month before it typically happens. Snowpack is at 119 percent of average in the Yampa and White River Basin and at 129 percent of average statewide.

And there's more snow coming. The National Weather Service is calling for snow showers in Steamboat on Wednesday and Thursday.

"It's so great that we finally had a good snow year because we've had year after year after year of drier, lower snowpack years," Steamboat Springs Water Resources Manager Kelly Romero-Heaney said. "It's just worth celebrating."

The impacts of those dry years don't disappear, though. As of Monday, Routt County was still under moderate drought and abnormally dry conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

"Runoff isn't going to be totally mirroring the snowpack because of low soil moisture," said Jim Pokrandt, community affairs director of the Colorado River District, which encompasses Routt County. "Some of the runoff is going to be going into the ground before it starts hitting the streams, which is a general fact when you're coming off of a couple dry, hot summers like we've had."

Soil moisture isn't the only impact to agriculture. Too much warm weather too soon could trigger early snowmelt, similar to what was seen in spring 2017. This means that water rushes downstream before producers are ready to divert and use it to irrigate hay meadows. Higher early spring temperatures are expected to occur more frequently as global temperatures warm.

"If we get an early runoff, then there's not as much water available later in the season both for irrigation for agriculture and to keep the river flowing because it runs off at a time when we can't use it," Romero-Heaney said.

"We just have to remember that there is no normal in Colorado," she said. "It's variable. It could stop snowing. It could melt early. It could not rain in the middle of the summer. We just have to be prepared for all that climate variability."

This chart compares 2019 to the five wettest years in the Yampa and White River Basin since the National Resources Conservation Service started tracking snowfall at Snotel sites in 1986. Check out the interactive chart below to compare this year to other years. (Charts courtesy NRCS)

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/YampaWild-SBT-031019-325x214.jpg
Letter to the editor: New surgery center a good start toward keeping outpatient costs down https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/letter-to-the-editor-new-surgery-center-a-good-start-toward-keeping-outpatient-costs-down/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 21:00:49 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334068 The Steamboat Pilot & Today recently reported a partnership between UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center and the Steamboat Orthopaedic & Spine Institute to create a new Ambulatory Surgery Center. This will create an opportunity to reduce the dramatic costs of outpatient orthopedic services. However, it […]]]>

The Steamboat Pilot & Today recently reported a partnership between UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center and the Steamboat Orthopaedic & Spine Institute to create a new Ambulatory Surgery Center. This will create an opportunity to reduce the dramatic costs of outpatient orthopedic services. However, it is our hope that, in the very near future, efforts be made to include all surgical and specialty medical services that are not currently in the plan. These physicians also have historically been very involved in attempting to develop a joint venture with the hospital to reduce the cost of services. The community remains vulnerable to the entrance of yet another outside organization to partner with physicians who are not currently included in the plan. It is our understanding the entire surgical community wants to work together with the hospital, and the introduction of an outside entity would damage that relationship.

Thank you to the hospital administration for listening to the community; we trust you will continue to listen. Many community members spoke out against the $30 million outpatient facility the hospital originally planned following the takeover of our community hospital by UCHealth. This new direction is a positive decision, but we feel it is extremely important to include all the surgeons who are not currently participating. It is not good business policy to divide the medical community serving Routt County.

Again, the Ambulatory Surgery Center is a good start toward keeping outpatient costs down. It is our expectation that the hospital will soon be able to include other, longtime surgeons in our community who have made numerous requests over two decades to create this type of partnership.

Linda Delaney
Gary Haberlan
Vail Kozatch
Nancy Spillane

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Half-naked woman poaches hot tub: The Record for Sunday, March 10 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/half-naked-woman-poaches-hot-tub-the-record-for-sunday-march-10/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 20:08:52 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334067 Sunday, March 10, 2019 1:25 a.m. Routt County Sheriff's Office deputies were called to a report of a suspicious vehicle at Routt County roads 14 and 14D. 1:30 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers conducted a traffic stop in the 3100 block of South Lincoln […]]]>

Sunday, March 10, 2019

1:25 a.m. Routt County Sheriff's Office deputies were called to a report of a suspicious vehicle at Routt County roads 14 and 14D.

1:30 a.m. Steamboat Springs Police Department officers conducted a traffic stop in the 3100 block of South Lincoln Avenue. A person was arrested on suspicion of DUI and DUI per se and received traffic citations for not carrying proof of insurance, having an open alcohol container and speeding.

1:51 a.m. A drunken man attempted to enter a gym in the 130 block of Lincoln Avenue. He was arrested on suspicion of first-degree burglary, a felony.

Crime Stoppers

If you have information about any unsolved crime, contact Routt County Crime Stoppers. You will remain anonymous and could earn a cash reward.

Submit a tip
• Call: 970-870-6226
• Click: TipSubmit.com
• Text: Send “NAMB” and your message to 274637

1:55 a.m. A drunken man was reportedly creating a disturbance and refused to leave a bar in the 2300 block of Mount Werner Circle. He left before officers arrived.

8:26 a.m. Deputies received a report of a suspicious person in the 35400 block of U.S. Highway 40 near Steamboat.

9:59 a.m. Oak Creek Fire Protection District firefighters responded to a smoking wood pellet stove that someone believed was on fire in the 200 block of Nancy Crawford Boulevard in Oak Creek. Everything was OK.

10:20 a.m. Officers received a report of threats in the 1400 block of Conestoga Circle. Two neighbors were in a dispute over a fence.

10:39 a.m. Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue firefighters were called to assist someone with a back injury at Dry Lake Campground.

1:31 p.m. Officers received a report of harassment in the 3400 block of Apres Ski Way. Two neighbors were in a dispute over snowplowing.

2:32 p.m. A vehicle was left unattended at Gondola Transit Center. The owner came back to the car before officers arrived.

3:26 p.m. Deputies were called to a report of a suspicious person on U.S. 40 near the border of Routt and Moffat counties.

4:05 p.m. Oak Creek firefighters were called to a traumatic injury in the 100 block of Moffat Avenue in Oak Creek.

5:53 p.m. A lodging employee in the 2200 block of Village Inn Court contacted officers about a drunken woman who was using the hot tub illegally and creating a disturbance. The woman then exited the lobby and began walking around the base area in her underwear. Officers found her at a restaurant in the 2200 block of Apres Ski Way. She resisted and attempted to fight with officers. Steamboat firefighters transported her to UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center, where she was medically cleared. She was then arrested on suspicion of disorderly conduct, harassment and obstructing a peace officer — all misdemeanors.

6:46 p.m. North Routt Fire Protection District responded to an unknown injury vehicle crash near mile marker 19 on Routt County Road 129.

9:06 p.m. A drunken man was seen waiting for a ride outside of a grocery store in Central Park Plaza. A car picked him up before officers arrived.

Total incidents: 42

  • Steamboat officers had 21 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Sheriff’s deputies had 10 cases that included calls for service and officer-initiated incidents such as traffic stops.
  • Steamboat firefighters responded to eight calls for service.
  • Oak Creek firefighters responded to two calls for service.
  • North Routt firefighters responded to one call for service.

The Record offers a glimpse of police activity and is not a comprehensive report of all police activity. Calls such as domestic violence, sexual assaults and juvenile situations typically do not appear in The Record.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/The-Record_logo-325x192.jpg
Matt Karzen: Annexation opposers hold Yampa Valley’s middle class hostage https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/matt-karzen-annexation-opposers-hold-yampa-valleys-middle-class-hostage/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 19:36:43 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334065 If you signed the recent petition regarding the West Steamboat Neighborhoods housing annexation, did you believe you were supporting progress in accessible housing for working families? If so, you were deceived. The Lets Vote Committee has one goal: kill the project. Not that you would […]]]>

If you signed the recent petition regarding the West Steamboat Neighborhoods housing annexation, did you believe you were supporting progress in accessible housing for working families? If so, you were deceived. The Lets Vote Committee has one goal: kill the project. Not that you would know that from the sales pitch of the committee spokesperson.

Introducing the topic to would-be signers, the committee spokesperson began this way, "Are you in favor of affordable housing in Steamboat? Would you sign a petition to get affordable housing on the ballot?" This last sentence was followed by their salesman pointing to the words "West Steamboat Annexation" on a document, as if the petition supported the annexation.

Did they volunteer that Steamboat Springs City Council already approved the annexation? Provide opportunity, as required by law, to read the 140 page annexation before signing the petition? Tell you it includes 2 acres of land donated to the Yampa Valley Housing Authority for approximately 50 low-income apartments? That it provides another 108 deed-restricted homes to locally employed residents, across a variety of income levels, equitably available through a lottery system? That Brynn Grey will donate land for a new public school and over $20 million to taxpayers for infrastructure?

No. Their idea of informing people what they were signing was to bury that information. What their petition did was undo City Council’s approval of all that progress, delaying it for an election closed to everyone financially unable to live inside city limits. What their petition did was delay progress that, by any objective measure, addresses critical needs of the valley's modern working middle class.

Some of these opposers have been pushing their “all or nothing” housing agenda for a decade. Realities change, but they don't — to them it's a game. But, it's no game to the actual working professionals currently in the valley struggling to make a home in 2019. These West Steamboat Neighborhoods opposers hold the valley's entire middle class hostage to enforce their omnipotent wisdom. Their motto: "My progress or no progress."

An important, accessible housing plan with very favorable community terms was approved, ready for execution. But, the opposers got their signatures, tentatively, and now, area affordable housing may face city-only ballot. Council decided this on modern facts, not half-truths and expired abstract ideas. If you signed the petition and now feel you were mislead, I invite you to consider contacting the City Clerk office at 970-871-8248 to withdraw your signature.

Matt Karzen

Steamboat Springs

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/LetterToTheEditor_logo-325x192.jpg
Monday Medical: Hyperthyroidism — Things to Know https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/monday-medical-hyperthyroidism-things-to-know/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 15:00:12 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334025 Editor's note: This is Part 1 of a 2-part series about common issues with the thyroid gland. Part 2 will cover hypothyroidism, or the condition in which too little thyroid hormone is produced. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that acts as […]]]>

Editor's note: This is Part 1 of a 2-part series about common issues with the thyroid gland. Part 2 will cover hypothyroidism, or the condition in which too little thyroid hormone is produced.

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that acts as the body's thermostat by producing just the right amount of thyroid hormone.

However, sometimes, it makes too much or too little. When that happens, a wide-range of symptoms can result.

Below, Dr. Jessica Devin, an endocrinologist with UCHealth Endocrinology Clinic in Steamboat Springs, outlines what to know about hyperthyroidism, a condition in which the thyroid makes too much hormone.

Thyroid 101

The thyroid gland makes two hormones that are secreted into the bloodstream: thyroxine, also known as T4, and triiodothyronine, also known as T3.

"They affect so many things," Devin said. "Energy levels and metabolism; heart rate and temperature regulation; how quickly your bowels move; skin and hair; menstrual cycles. They can influence mood a lot, too."

Thyroid hormone is released in response to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pituitary gland. TSH levels then respond to how much thyroid hormone is released, similar to a check and balance system. If thyroid hormone levels are low, then TSH levels become high; if there's too much thyroid hormone, then TSH drops.

TSH level is often the first lab checked when a thyroid problem is suspected.

Why the excess?

Hyperthyroidism is often caused by Graves' disease, an autoimmune condition in which the thyroid gland is inappropriately stimulated to make too much hormone. Autoimmune diseases have a genetic component, so if you have a close relative with Celiac disease, Type 1 diabetes or a thyroid issue, you may be more susceptible.

The condition can also result from thyroid nodules or thyroiditis; the latter is an inflammation of the thyroid gland due to various causes such as viral illness or postpartum changes.

"When the thyroid gets inflamed, it can spill extra hormone into the blood," Devin said.

With hyperthyroidism, a blood test will reveal high levels of T4 and T3 and low levels of TSH. An ultrasound or scan can help determine what's causing the high levels and, therefore, how best to treat it.

Common symptoms

Unexplained weight loss, feeling weak and washed out, tiredness, a racing heart, decreased endurance in exercise and a tremor are the main symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease can also result in eye issues.

"People tend to have a hard time with mental clarity and focusing," Devin said. "It can feel like being on a lot of caffeine."

Because of unexpected weight loss or heart palpitations, hyperthyroidism is often more quickly diagnosed than hypothyroidism, which can result in weight gain or difficulty losing weight.

What to do

"Therapies are aimed at two things: treating the symptoms of hyperthyroidism or decreasing the synthesis of thyroid hormone," Devin said. "The therapy you use depends on the form of hyperthyroidism you have."

Often, medications are prescribed to slow down the thyroid gland. Radioactive iodine therapy may be used to gradually and permanently normalize the levels, while beta-blockers can help address heart palpitations. In rare cases, surgery may be necessary.

Left untreated, hyperthyroidism can result in bone loss, heart problems and other issues. "You definitely want to treat it," Devin said.

Cautions

With any thyroid issue, iodine or thyroid supplements should be avoided.

"Those can be quite dangerous to take," Devin said. "They can influence thyroid hormone synthesis and can make the problem worse."

Similarly, people with hyperthyroidism should be aware of cold medications, which can further stimulate the heart rate.

With hyperthyroidism, patients can feel improvements quickly.

"While it can take months for levels to normalize, patients usually feel improvement within a few weeks with the right therapy," Devin said.

Susan Cunningham writes for UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center. She can be reached at cunninghamsbc@gmail.com.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Monday-Medical-2017-app-image-01-325x192.jpg
Best of the Boat radio station: KBCR Big Country Radio https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/best-of-the-boat-radio-station-kbcr-big-country-radio/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 15:00:01 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=328032 At KBCR Big Country Radio, the concept is simple. Give the people what they want. General Manager Brian Harvey said its success can be attributed to its community involvement. The station sponsors a wealth of local events, such as the Routt County Fair, and does […]]]>
KBCR's Brian Harvey master-minding another "Harvey's Huddle." Big Country Radio won this year’s Best Radio Station award. (courtesy photo)

At KBCR Big Country Radio, the concept is simple. Give the people what they want.

For more

Find complete 2018 Best of the Boat results here.

General Manager Brian Harvey said its success can be attributed to its community involvement. The station sponsors a wealth of local events, such as the Routt County Fair, and does live remotes from such events as the Downtown Halloween Stroll and Steamboat Springs Chamber mixers.

Local radio also offers something national radio can’t: between songs, local deejays present local news, weather and sports and publicize upcoming community events. The station also focuses heavily on local interviews and live-streams video on its website from school athletic events.

Despite new ways to access programming, “People are still attracted to their local radio,” Harvey said. “As long as we’re making it accessible and free, it will continue to be viable."

Best Radio Station

• Winner: KBCR

• Runners-up: KUNC-KRNC and KFMU

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Radio-KBCR-Harvey-325x217.jpg
New program seeks to increase access to sign language interpreters in rural Colorado https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/new-program-seeks-to-increase-access-to-sign-language-interpreters-in-rural-colorado/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 02:44:18 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334060 Editor’s note: This story was updated at 10:45 a.m. Monday to correct Erica Gallagher’s title. STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Amid a shortage of certified American Sign Language interpreters in rural areas, Colorado is launching a pilot program to provide free, in-person ASL interpreters to people who are […]]]>

Editor’s note: This story was updated at 10:45 a.m. Monday to correct Erica Gallagher’s title.

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Amid a shortage of certified American Sign Language interpreters in rural areas, Colorado is launching a pilot program to provide free, in-person ASL interpreters to people who are deaf, hard of hearing or deafblind in Routt County.

A lack of certified American Sign Language interpreters in the area touches many areas of the community, from seeking medical care, interacting with law enforcement and attendance at community events.

Through the Rural Interpreting Services Project, the state seeks to improve access to ASL interpretation both by providing certified interpreters and working to train and certify more interpreters.

At a glance

To request an interpreter through the Rural Interpreting Services Project, visit http://www.colorisp.com to fill out a request online. You can also contact the program in the following ways:
Email: ccdhhdb_risp@state.co.us
Video phone: 720-457-3679
Voice phone: 303-866-4824

If you fill out a request online, you should receive a confirmation immediately. Fill out the form again if you do not receive a confirmation. RISP asks that you submit your request two weeks in advance of the date you need an interpreter, but program coordinators will do their best to fill last minute requests.

According to Trish Leakey, auxiliary services manager for the Colorado Commission for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deafblind, there are five certified ASL interpreters on the Western Slope, in Alamosa, Durango, Montrose and Grand Junction.

Leakey said she doesn't feel that the RISP's 25 interpreters, who travel around Colorado's eastern plains, southern high desert and Western Slope, are meeting the demand for ASL interpreters in rural communities.

"We've realized that a lot of these individuals are not even asking for interpreters," she said through an ASL interpreter. "They're not even putting in a request because they know that there's nobody that's even available, so they're like 'Why would I even bother asking for an interpreter when I know it’s not going to be provided?' They rely heavily on family and friends."

Lack of access creates pitfalls in care

In a town hall both to explain the program and listen to the community's needs, Northwest Colorado residents explained the lack of access they see for people who need ASL interpretation.

As of Jan. 31, the RISP received 213 requests for services, with more than half of those requests related to medical needs.

"When I've tried to come to Steamboat for a doctor's appointment, they say 'We're not going to pay for an interpreter," said Staci Nichols, of Craig, through an ASL interpreter. "But I'll ask, 'Well how much do you pay for Spanish interpreters? Because they do. … They provide Spanish interpreters, and they have actually hung up on me when I've brought that subject up. I've had to go other places that are farther for me in order to get services."

Others in the community, including representatives of the Steamboat Springs Police Department, Routt County Human Services, Integrated Community and Mind Springs Health, explained they don't know where to find an interpreter, when and if they need one.

"I feel like it may be the lack of interpreters that keep people from accessing our services," said Gina Toothaker, outpatient program director at Mind Springs Health. "It comes up maybe once or twice a year, and we don't know how to access those people either. … I feel like we could be serving more people if we had access."

At UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center, patients who have hearing disabilities communicate with healthcare providers using video remote interpreting services, essentially an ASL interpreter over webcam, but a faulty internet connection can disrupt communication and care, according to the hospital's Language Services Manager Erica Gallagher.

"Over the years I've tried to access a certified interpreter, and the closest I was able to find was either Denver or Grand Junction," Gallagher said.

In the three instances in which an in-person interpreter attempted to come up, Gallagher said bad weather, road closures and a three-day waiting period for the interpreter made it impossible to pair patients with an in-person interpreter.

In situations where people cannot or do not access an interpreter for medical visits, many patients and doctors end up writing notes across the table, Leakey said.

"Could you imagine communicating back and forth in writing all of that, and talking about your issues?" she asked. "You would really condense it, and it would really be limited and not necessarily effective. I do suspect that if we can increase the numbers of interpreters, then the Deaf community will actually have better access."

The common barriers RISP program coordinators have found ring true in Northwest Colorado: a lack of knowledge in where to find interpreters, the cost of providing interpretation and geographic barriers, said Leakey.

Increasing access to ASL interpreters

Four hands sign R-I-S-P, the acronym of a new state-funded project to increase access and interpreters in Colorado’s rural areas. (Photo by Michael Armstrong)

The RISP program was funded by the legislature for a two-year pilot.

The program provides free, certified, in-person interpretation to Colorado's Western Slope and other rural areas. Interpreters can be requested for medical or legal appointments, events, job interviews or any other meeting.

By Colorado law, interpreters are certified by the Colorado Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Interpreters must pass the organization's certifying exam to call themselves an interpreter, though current legislation under consideration could expand the state's rule to recognize ASL interpretation certifications from other states.

This certification is crucial, said Timothy Chevalier, the commission's outreach and consultative services manager, because this ensures an interpreter is able to unbiasedly and accurately convey the message of whomever they are communicating on behalf of. This doesn't always happen when someone who is deaf or hard of hearing uses a friend or family member to communicate with people who don't sign.

Chevalier explained that growing up with two parents who were deaf, he translated his parents' ASL to his instructors in parent-teacher conferences.

"I always came out with a glowing report," he said with a laugh.

But on a serious note, Chevalier explained that in one instance, a Colorado woman with a hearing disability was sexually assaulted. Law enforcement grabbed the closest nearby person who could sign, which happened to be her daughter. The woman wasn't comfortable conveying what had happened through her daughter, which created problems as she tried to report the incident to police.

In addition to providing interpreters, the RISP hopes to train more interpreters in rural areas. One program will help people who sign and are interested in becoming a certified interpreter receive the training and testing required to become certified with financial and mentorship support. Another program provides scholarships to students studying ASL and Interpreting Studies at the University of Northern Colorado.

RISP interpreters can't serve the needs of students who need educational interpreting, or interactions with state and federal agencies. Other entities are responsible for providing access to interpreters in those situations. RISP can serve parents who would like an interpreter to attend meetings or events at their child's school.

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/sign-sbt-031119-325x151.jpg
8,000+ skiers hit slopes this winter at Howelsen Hill’s Ski Free Sundays https://www.steamboatpilot.com/news/more-than-8000-skiers-hit-the-slopes-at-steamboats-ski-free-sundays-on-howelsen-hill-this-winter/ Sun, 10 Mar 2019 23:53:04 +0000 https://www.steamboatpilot.com/?p=334051 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Sunday, the magic carpets on Howelsen Hill slowed to a stop, and the chairlift stopped turning for the final time this winter. Closing out the season with one last Ski Free Sunday, Howelsen Hill Ski Area's alpine runs are closed to the […]]]>
20-month-old Alice Pulford, followed by 19-month-old Gonzalo Gooding, ride up the Small Magic Carpet at Howelsen Hill Ski Area on Sunday. This year, more than 8,716 skiers and riders hit the slopes on Ski Free Sundays. (Photo by Eleanor C. Hasenbeck)

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — On Sunday, the magic carpets on Howelsen Hill slowed to a stop, and the chairlift stopped turning for the final time this winter. Closing out the season with one last Ski Free Sunday, Howelsen Hill Ski Area's alpine runs are closed to the public until the next season, though the Howelsen Hill Nordic Center will remain open a bit longer.

In the coming weeks, there are a few remaining Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club events on the hill. By late March, city crews will start scraping snow off of the historic ski hill in an attempt to prevent landslides.

By the numbers

Ski Free Sunday skiers and riders this winter: more than 8,716
Ski Free Sunday skiers last winter: 8,016
Estimated number of times a single Poma platter climbs the hill on a Ski Free Sunday: 60
Number of free Moutain Tap beers claimed with Ski Free Sunday lift tickets: more than 150
Number of staff hours donated by Ohana, Mountain Tap, Harvest Skis and the Morningside String Brand to Howelsen’s Sunday Funday fundraiser event: 92 hours
Money raised to support the Howelsen Hill Endowment Fund this year: $4,826

On Ski Free Sundays, cross country skiers, alpine skiers and alpine snowboarders received free lift tickets. For the final Ski Free Sunday of the season, the city celebrated with free jump lessons from Winter Sports Club coaches and free hot dogs grilled up by Steamboat Springs City Council members.

In the city's fourth season hosting Ski Free Sundays, the program has grown in popularity and number of ski-for-free days offered. It kicked off in January 2016, with three free days attracting more than 900 skiers before the snow melted that year.

The 2018-2019 season had 15 free days, which attracted more than 8,716 skiers and riders, including a record-breaking day with 1,079 skiers on the hill on the Dec. 30, 2018, Ski Free Sunday.

"We never had a thousand people at Howelsen before Ski Free Sundays," said Howelsen Ski and Rodeo Complex Manager Brad Setter.

This year, the hill had more staff and more ski patrollers in place on Sundays to better serve beginner skiers.

"We really like being busy at Howelsen," he said. "My staff likes teaching people how to ride the Poma and help 'em out and try to facilitate a good time on the snow. We definitely enjoy getting folks on the snow, and it's definitely a different clientele than we have normally, being more of a training facility Tuesday through Friday."

Weigh in

 

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

 

Skiing is not an inexpensive hobby. Even if a skier owns their equipment, there are repeating annual costs to keep that equipment in tune and get on the mountain at a resort.

As season pass prices at Steamboat Resort creep up, and daily walk-up ticket rates reached record highs this winter, Howelsen Hill, though a small ski area, is a mighty force in making the sport accessible.

"We don't have a pass to the big mountain, and this is how we go skiing with our family, so we love it," said Julie Bridgewater, typically a snowboarder, but with her three-year-old son Cal on Sunday, she was on skis. "We depend on it."

Howelsen is her home mountain for her family of four. Her six-year-old daughter mastered the Poma lift this season. They celebrated her son's third birthday with a party at Howelsen.

"We're getting a lot of folks skiing at the facility who would not otherwise be able to ski," Setter said. "We've got a lot of folks traveling here from Hayden and Craig. We've got some folks coming from as far as Leadville on a regular basis that might not otherwise have the opportunity to ski anywhere — that might be priced out of skiing. It's a very unique niche to be able to get people into the sport and give them an opportunity to learn how to ski without having to pay a lot of money, at least on lift tickets. We're pretty excited about that."

Andrew Fox, with son Wyatt on his back, skis down the bunny hill at Howelsen Hill on Sunday. (Photo by Eleanor C. Hasenbeck)

For 11 Ski Free Sundays this season, the city tracked whether the recipients of free lift tickets were in their first year of the sport. During those 11 days, an average of 14 percent of the skiers and riders heading up the hill were in their first year of learning to ski or snowboard, according to data provided to the Steamboat Pilot & Today.

On Sunday, a family from Missouri clomped over to the hill in snowboard boots, determined to figure out how to slide downhill strapped to a piece of wood and fiberglass for the first time ever.

For the most part, Ski Free Sunday attracts residents of Northwest Colorado, but this year, depending on the weekend, about 30 percent of Ski Free Sunday skiers were from out of state or other areas of the state.

Last year, 43 percent of Ski Free Sunday skiers were from Steamboat, and 60 percent were from Routt County. Three percent were from Craig, 19 percent were from elsewhere in Colorado, 17 percent from out of state and 1 percent were from another country. Final data was not available about this year's attendance.

Notably, there were bumps in the number of out-of-towners on Howelsen Hill during the dates in which the Ikon Base Pass had blackout dates at Steamboat. There were more visitors than locals on the hill on Dec. 30, and Jan. 20. Setter guessed these were Front Range skiers who didn't want to head back through the Eisenhower Tunnel without skiing.

Setter said the city is working to build a more festive atmosphere at Howelsen, with more picnic tables and benches. If the program continues next year, he said the city will seek sponsors.

City Council will consider whether to continue the program, likely at one of its spring meetings. In an informal poll of the four council members handing out free hot dogs on Howelsen's closing day, council members indicated support for the program in some form.

"I would hope that we would continue to do it," Council Member Robin Crossan said. "Whether we can expand it or not, I don't know, but I would surely hope that we can continue to do what we're doing at the least."

Bill Manley helps Cody Manley into a ski glove Sunday at Howelsen Hill.

To reach Eleanor Hasenbeck, call 970-871-4210, email ehasenbeck@SteamboatPilot.com or follow her on Twitter @elHasenbeck.

]]>
https://www.steamboatpilot.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/howelsen-sbt-031119-2-1-325x241.jpg
rss Block
Select a Blog Page to create an RSS feed link. Learn more
Snow Stake Control (PHQ)
Snow Stake Control (PHQ)
Circuit Breaker 1 
Motor 1 (Daily)ON
Circuit Breaker 2 
Motor 2 (Storm Total)ON
  Current Time: Init...